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Lifestyle Health and Wellbeing 19 Aug 2019 Healthy diet boosts ...

Healthy diet boosts women’s emotional well-being

ANI
Published Aug 19, 2019, 12:12 pm IST
Updated Aug 19, 2019, 12:12 pm IST
Diet impacts emotional well-being in women more than men.
Gender-based differential food and energy intake may explain the differential brain volumes and connectivity between females and males. (Photo: Representational/Pixabay)
 Gender-based differential food and energy intake may explain the differential brain volumes and connectivity between females and males. (Photo: Representational/Pixabay)

Washington: Women may require a more nutrient-rich diet for their emotional well-being as compared to men, suggests a study.

The study was published in the journal 'Nutritional Neuroscience.'

 

Evidence suggests that anatomical and functional differences in men's and women's brain dictate susceptibility to mental disease. However, little is known about the role of dietary patterns in gender-specific psychological well-being.

A team of researchers led by Lina Begdache, assistant professor of health and wellness studies at Binghamton University, conducted an anonymous survey of 563 participants (48 per cent men and 52 per cent women) through social media to investigate this issue.

Begdache and her team found that men are more likely to experience mental well-being until nutritional deficiencies arise. Women, however, are less likely to experience mental well-being until a balanced diet and a healthy lifestyle are followed.

 

According to Begdache, these results may explain reports from previous studies that show that women are at a greater risk for mental distress when compared to men, and emphasise the role of a nutrient-dense diet in mental wellbeing.

"The biggest takeaway is that women may need a larger spectrum of nutrients to support mood, compared to men," said Begdache.

"These findings may explain the reason why women are twice more likely to be diagnosed with anxiety and depression and suffer from longer episodes, compared to men. Today's diet is high in energy but poor in key nutrients that support brain anatomy and functionality," she added.

 

"Males and females had different physical and emotional responsibilities that may have necessitated different energy requirements and food preference," she said.

"Gender-based differential food and energy intake may explain the differential brain volumes and connectivity between females and males. Therefore, a potential mismatch is happening between our contemporary diet and the evolved human brain which is disturbing the normal functionality of certain systems in the brain," she added.

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