74th Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra80229286942849 Tamil Nadu2869415762235 Delhi2633410315708 Gujarat19119130111190 Rajasthan100847359218 Uttar Pradesh97335648257 Madhya Pradesh89965878384 West Bengal73032912366 Karnataka4835169357 Bihar4598223329 Andhra Pradesh4250256573 Haryana3597120924 Telangana32901627113 Jammu and Kashmir3142104835 Odisha247814819 Punjab2415204347 Assam19894434 Kerala170071215 Uttarakhand115328610 Jharkhand7642975 Chhatisgarh6781892 Tripura6221730 Himachal Pradesh3691636 Chandigarh3022225 Goa126570 Manipur124110 Puducherry90330 Nagaland8000 Arunachal Pradesh3710 Meghalaya33131 Mizoram1710 Sikkim200
Lifestyle Health and Wellbeing 19 Jul 2019 Decoded: Why women a ...

Decoded: Why women are more to Alzheimer’s than men

ANI
Published Jul 19, 2019, 9:13 am IST
Updated Jul 19, 2019, 9:13 am IST
Here's why Alzheimer's is more prevalent in women than men?
Researchers used data from positron emission tomography (PET) scans of healthy individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment who were enrolled in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. (Photo: ANI)
 Researchers used data from positron emission tomography (PET) scans of healthy individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment who were enrolled in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. (Photo: ANI)

Washington: While the accumulation of proteins in the brain is a marker to indicate the onset of Alzheimer's, a new study analysed the ways in which these proteins spread, that might help in describing why the disease is more prevalent in males" females than males.

A recent study presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference has identified differences in the spread of a protein called tau, which is linked to cognitive impairment -- between men and women, with women showing a larger brain-wide accumulation of tau than men due to an accelerated brain-wide spread.

 

Accumulating evidence suggests that tau spreads through brain tissue like an infection, traveling from neuron to neuron and turning other proteins into abnormal tangles, subsequently killing brain cells.

Researchers used data from positron emission tomography (PET) scans of healthy individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment who were enrolled in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database.

"It's kind of like reconstructing a crime scene after a crime. You weren't there when it happened, but you can determine where an intruder entered a house and what room they entered next," said Sepi Shokouhi, lead investigator for the study.

"The graph analysis does something similar to show how tau spreads from one region to another," Shokouhi added. The findings showed that the architecture of tau networks is different in men and women, with women having a larger number of "bridging regions" that connect various communities in the brain.

This difference may allow tau to spread more easily between regions, boosting the speed at which it accumulates and putting women at greater risk for developing Alzheimer's disease. The lead study investigator said, "Understanding how different biological processes influence our memory is a really important topic."

"Sex-specific differences in the brain's pathological, neuroanatomical and functional organisation may map into differences at a neurobehavioral and cognitive level, thus explaining differences in the prevalence of neurodegenerative disorders and helping us develop appropriate treatments," Shokouhi opined.

...




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT