Lifestyle Health and Wellbeing 17 Mar 2018 Male pills that bloc ...

Male pills that blocks sperm in penis could be available in just 5 years, says study

DECCAN CHRONICLE
Published Mar 17, 2018, 1:20 pm IST
Updated Mar 17, 2018, 1:20 pm IST
With the non-hormonal approach, sperm are unaffected so the contraception is likely to be reversible once the medication wears out.
Women have called for trials as they have repeatedly demanded contraception shouldn’t be dished out to one gender.  (Photo: Pixabay)
 Women have called for trials as they have repeatedly demanded contraception shouldn’t be dished out to one gender. (Photo: Pixabay)

According to a new study, a hormone-free male contraceptive pill could soon be a reality. Aussie scientists claim that the reversible treatment is cent per cent effect and may be available in supermarkets in just 5 years.

Developed by Monash University, it will stop sperm from leaving penis during ejaculation.

 

It works by blocking two key proteins in the brain that are responsible for releasing swimmers during a male orgasm.

And they claim that it could boost libido by dilating blood vessels – exactly how Viagra works.

According to lead researcher Dr Sab Ventura, the trials will begin if the next stage of drug development proves successful.

The project has just received a vital funding boost of £107,000 ($150,000) by the US-based Male Contraceptive Iniative.

Speaking about it, he said, “We are moving closer to developing a convenient, safe and effective, non-hormonal oral male contraceptive that can be readily reversed. We aim to do this by developing a combination of two drugs that simultaneously block sperm transport rather than disrupt sperm development or maturation.”

He further added that with the non-hormonal approach, sperm are unaffected so the contraception is likely to be reversible once the medication wears out.

The idea of a male contraceptive has been touted for decades.

Women have called for trials as they have repeatedly demanded contraception shouldn’t be dished out to one gender.

However, trials of a male contraceptive have been hindered by the side effects, from irreversible damage to fertility problems and slashed libido.

The new drug, yet to be named, has been shown in early laboratory experiments to have no impact on sexual desire.

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