Lifestyle Health and Wellbeing 16 Nov 2019 Progressive menstrua ...

Progressive menstrual cup is still a mystery for many

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | ASMA ABDULLA
Published Nov 16, 2019, 2:45 am IST
Updated Nov 16, 2019, 2:45 am IST
Religious taboos, inhibition, prevent the popularisation of this period saver.
Since this is not available in the market, most of the users are depending on the online market to buy the product. “Many youngsters have come to the store enquiring menstrual cups, but we were not able to provide them”, said Malavika.
 Since this is not available in the market, most of the users are depending on the online market to buy the product. “Many youngsters have come to the store enquiring menstrual cups, but we were not able to provide them”, said Malavika.

KOZHIKODE: Menstrual Cup, an eco-friendly alternative to disposable sanitary pads is a recent addition to the market which is still unknown to many. Though it has been used by large number of elite women for the last many years, the cup is yet to be popularised, though is safe and as effective as sanitary pads and tampons, as well as less expensive, it was pointed out.

According to Malavika N, a pharmacist based in Kozhikode, people are slowly switching to these tiny cups which are flexible, bell-shaped devices made of silicone, rubber or latex. The cup can be inserted into the vagina to collect menstrual blood. They stay up for about 10 hours at a time and can be used for about 10 years, it was pointed out. The online markets priced the cup between Rs 200 to Rs 1000 in tune with the brands.

 

Since this is not available in the market, most of the users are depending on the online market to buy the product. “Many youngsters have come to the store enquiring menstrual cups, but we were not able to provide them”, said Malavika.

“It is available in very few pharmacies in the city since women are just started demanding them”, she added. Many users pointed out that the device is less popular as it is confined only in the progressive women circles. There are religious taboos related to menstrual period and also against inserting anything into vagina which prevents the popularization of the menstrual cup, it was pointed out.   

“It’s one of the most cost-efficient changes I’ve had”, said Fathima Abdul Khader, who switched to a menstrual cup from sanitary pads recently.  

 “In addition to it, being better for health, easier to dispose and more convenient while traveling, it feels so good to realize that I am not adding to the increasing amount of plastic waste accumulated every year through feminine hygiene products”, she pointed out.

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