Lifestyle Health and Wellbeing 16 May 2019 Guest column: ‘Aed ...

Guest column: ‘Aedes Aegypti breeds in fresh water’

DECCAN CHRONICLE.
Published May 16, 2019, 2:34 am IST
Updated May 16, 2019, 2:34 am IST
When a person gets infected with the Dengue virus, the symptoms are likely to last for at least seven to ten days.
The Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are a species of mosquitoes that are responsible for vector-borne diseases such as Dengue, Chikungunya infections.
 The Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are a species of mosquitoes that are responsible for vector-borne diseases such as Dengue, Chikungunya infections.

The onset of the rains have definitely cooled down the temperatures but have also lead to concern among Bengalureans with the rise in the population of mosquitoes. The pre-monsoon showers invariably lead to stagnant water on the roads and other places which offer favourable conditions for mosquitoes to breed – most often the Aedes aegypti species. There has been a rise in cases of Dengue in Karnataka and data by State Health and Family Welfare reports about 311 dengue cases found only within BBMP limits.

The Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are a species of mosquitoes that are responsible for vector-borne diseases such as Dengue, Chikungunya infections. These species bite mostly during the day and they breed in water collected in old drums, tyres, cans, etc. Dengue infection does not spread directly from person to person and mosquitoes are the vectors which transmit the Dengue virus.

 

When a person gets infected with the Dengue virus, the symptoms are likely to last for at least seven to ten days. The initial symptoms are a sudden rise in body temperature, severe pain in the muscles and joints, headache with associated pain behind the eyes, skin rashes and gastrointestinal problems like nausea, vomiting, and loose stools. Complications include severe dehydration, breathlessness, bleeding manifestations, reduced urine output, and kidney or liver involvement. The patient needs to be given plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration. In severe cases of Dengue especially when the patient is unable to tolerate orally, hospitalisation for intravenous fluids and electrolytes may be necessary. Complicated Dengue including Dengue Shock Syndrome and Dengue Haemorrrhagic Fever may even be life-threatening and require continuous monitoring and supportive care.

Dr. Jyothsna Krishnappa, Senior Consultant - Internal Medicine, Apollo Hospitals Bannerghatta Road

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Location: India, Karnataka, Bengaluru




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