Lifestyle Health and Wellbeing 15 Sep 2017 Antidepressants rais ...

Antidepressants raise risk of early death by 33 percent

DECCAN CHRONICLE
Published Sep 15, 2017, 4:35 pm IST
Updated Sep 16, 2017, 7:30 am IST
Psychiatrists have raised doubts over findings, arguing antidepressants are often last resort for people with no other options.
The authors of the controversial paper are of the opinion that antidepressants do more harm than good. (Photo: Pixabay)
 The authors of the controversial paper are of the opinion that antidepressants do more harm than good. (Photo: Pixabay)

A major new study now reveals that taking antidepressants could increase the risk of early death.

Experts found that depressed people without heart disease were 33 percent more likely to die over any set period, for any reason, if they were too addicted to antidepressants, as compared to those who were not.

 

The authors of the controversial paper are of the opinion that antidepressants do more harm than good.

However, psychiatrists have raised doubts over the findings, arguing that antidepressants have been safely used for years and is often a last resort for people with no other options.

The new analysis suggests that people who take the pills are at a greater risk than previously estimated.

Scientists at McMaster University in Canada combined results from 17 studies to come to the conclusion.

While initially the overall result was nine percent, on removing people who already were suffering from cardiovascular diseases from the study, the number jumber to a whopping 33 percent.

 

The scientists think this is because antidepressants are also a blood thinner - which actually protects the health of people with heart disease because it stops blood clotting.

But among people without heart disease, this is dangerous because it increases the risk of a major haemorrhage or internal bleed.

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