133rd Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra45019628703015842 Tamil Nadu2632222022834241 Andhra Pradesh166586886781537 Karnataka139571625002594 Delhi1384821242544021 Uttar Pradesh97362553931778 West Bengal78232548181731 Telangana6766048609551 Gujarat64684476632504 Bihar5956738508336 Rajasthan4555532051719 Assam4527633429109 Haryana3717330470440 Odisha3629723074248 Madhya Pradesh3428524099900 Kerala268731527885 Jammu and Kashmir2200614032407 Punjab1852711882442 Jharkhand135004794125 Chhatisgarh9820725661 Uttarakhand7800453890 Goa6816487656 Tripura5389360527 Puducherry3982241156 Manipur292017667 Himachal Pradesh2818165813 Nagaland21296574 Arunachal Pradesh175810633 Chandigarh116070619 Meghalaya9022645 Sikkim6882971 Mizoram4962660
Lifestyle Health and Wellbeing 12 Aug 2017 Scientists gene-edit ...

Scientists gene-edit piglets, pave way for human transplants

PTI
Published Aug 12, 2017, 10:41 am IST
Updated Aug 12, 2017, 10:41 am IST
Scientists successfully edit embryonic cells into chemical cocktail that encourages growth without destructive effects of modification.
Humans can already receive pig heart valves and pancreases, but scientists have long sought to make their entire organs, which grow to around human size, available for harvest. (Photo: Pixabay)
 Humans can already receive pig heart valves and pancreases, but scientists have long sought to make their entire organs, which grow to around human size, available for harvest. (Photo: Pixabay)

Washington: Scientists have successfully edited the genetic code of piglets to remove dormant viral infections, a breakthrough that could eventually pave the way for animal-to-human organ transplants.

Their work, documented in the US journal Science on Thursday, could save lives by reducing organ donor waiting lists that have risen over the years, partly thanks to better road safety.

 

There are some 117,000 people on the US transplant waiting list alone, according to official data, while 22 people die each day waiting for an organ.

Harvard University geneticists George Church and Luhan Yang, together with a team of Danish and Chinese collaborators, placed edited embryonic cells into a chemical cocktail that encouraged growth and overcame the destructive effect inherent in the modification process.

They then used a standard cloning technique to insert the edited DNA into egg cells that were placed into a surrogate mother.

 

"Before our study, there was huge scientific uncertainty about whether the pig [produced after this editing] is viable," Yang said, adding the team had now produced 37 piglets free of the porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs).

"If this is correct, it's a great achievement," said virologist Joachim Denner of the Robert Koch Institute in Berlin, an expert in the retroviruses.

It is not clear whether PERVs would infect humans who receive pig organs, but lab studies have shown human cells can be infected by the viruses in a dish.

 

Humans can already receive pig heart valves and pancreases, but scientists have long sought to make their entire organs, which grow to around human size, available for harvest.

But the goal of xenotransplantation remains some way off. Researchers still need to edit pig genes to avoid triggering a human immune system reaction and prevent toxic interactions in blood.

These steps "are probably more challenging" than removing the dormant infections, said Yang.

...




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT