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Lifestyle Health and Wellbeing 12 May 2018 Napolean complex: Sh ...

Napolean complex: Short-man syndrome is real, they are more aggressive

DECCAN CHRONICLE
Published May 12, 2018, 2:22 pm IST
Updated May 12, 2018, 2:22 pm IST
Scientists confirm smaller men act more aggressively to make up for their lack of height.
Researchers deduced this by using a money sharing conundrum, dubbed the Dictator Game, which tests how fairly individuals treat others.
 Researchers deduced this by using a money sharing conundrum, dubbed the Dictator Game, which tests how fairly individuals treat others.

According to a new study, it seems short men really do act more aggressively than their peers to make up for their small stature.

Researchers deduced this by using a money sharing conundrum, dubbed the Dictator Game, which tests how fairly individuals treat others.

 

The test typically consists of two individuals, with one given a quantity of money which they must offer a portion of to a rival - even if the amount is zero.

According to the study, they found that smaller men responded more aggressively when competing in the psychological test.

Scientists say this means the phenomenon, known as short-man syndrome, or the Napoleon Complex, is real.

The findings were made by researchers from Vrije University in the Netherlands, according to reports in New Scientist.

Volunteers were asked how much they would like to keep for themselves, and how much to leave for their adversary.

 

The shortest men in the study, at around 5ft, 7in (1.7m), kept 14 chips for themselves on average. The tallest men, who were 6ft 6in (2m) kept just nine.

However, when the threat of repercussions were introduced, shorter men did not display any more aggression that their rivals.

Speaking about it, lead author of the study Jill Knapen, told New Scientist that it is probably smart for short men to be like that because they get less opportunities to get resources.

Studies have shown that tall people are wealthier, more successful at work, healthier and even enjoy better love lives than their smaller counterparts.

 

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