Lifestyle Health and Wellbeing 11 Apr 2018 Researchers discover ...

Researchers discover link between PCOS and mental health issues

DECCAN CHRONICLE
Published Apr 11, 2018, 12:53 pm IST
Updated Apr 11, 2018, 12:53 pm IST
The condition also increases women's chances of having children who will likely suffer from ADHD or autism.
Researchers discover link between PCOS and mental health issues. (Photo: Pixabay)
 Researchers discover link between PCOS and mental health issues. (Photo: Pixabay)

Researchers have found women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) are more prone to suffer from mental health issues, the Daily Mail reported.

A team from Cardiff University also discovered their children will likely suffer from ADHD or autism.

 

For the study, researchers examined data of 17,000 women's mental health records who suffer from PCOS. That information was then comapred to women who  did not suffer from the condition.

Women with PCOS were found to be suffering from a host of mental health issues like depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety and eating disorder.

"It's difficult to be certain what may drive the increased risk of mental health disorders," study co-author Dr Aled Rees told the Daily Mail. Adding, "Certainly, hormonal effects may play a role. Other factors may include concerns in relation to body weight, fertility, hair growth and menstrual disturbance among others."

 

The chronic ovarian cyst condition causes infertility and can be extremely painful. It has also grown to be a popular health issue among women.

PCOS, a hormonal condition, is different from other ovarian cysts due to its hidden complications.

It raises the levels of male hormones, causes irregular perios, acne and facial hair.

Researchers need to investigate why women with PCOS suffer mental health issues and how it impacts brain development of a fetus. "Further research is needed to determine which components of the syndrome might be driving the increased risk of mental health disorders, and indeed whether all patients with PCOS are at increased risk or only some," Dr Rees explained.

 

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