Lifestyle Health and Wellbeing 09 Oct 2017 Not liking greens co ...

Not liking greens could be in your genes

DECCAN CHRONICLE
Published Oct 9, 2017, 10:45 am IST
Updated Oct 9, 2017, 10:46 am IST
Scientists discover eating mutations that may explain why people don't like certain types of food.
The breakthrough could open door to new ways of tacking childhood obesity epidemic, say researchers. (Representative Image)
 The breakthrough could open door to new ways of tacking childhood obesity epidemic, say researchers. (Representative Image)

A new study finds that not finishing greens is actually down to a child’s genes and nothing to do with their parents.

The study found two genetic mutations which puts off youngsters trying new food and the other that turns them into fussy eaters.

 

The breakthrough could open door to new ways of tacking childhood obesity epidemic, say researchers.

While British scientists suggested last year that toddlers’ fussy eating habits are linked to genetics that being brought up badly, new study in the US has now found DNA variants that are believed to be related to the perception of bitter taste among two to four year-olds.

One, known as TAS2R38, is associated with limited dietary variety and the other called CA6 with being out of control during mealtimes.

While people many a times blame parents for children being fussy about food, evidence is increasing that it's a matter of nature and not nurture - with parents being largely blameless.

Speaking to The Daily Mail, Nutritional scientist Natasha Cole said it's not surprising children who are genetically 'bitter-sensitive' may be more likely to turn down Brussel sprouts or broccoli, for instance.

Doctoral student Ms Cole, a member of an obesity prevention program at Illinois University, hopes it can help identify the determinants of picky eating in early childhood.

The genes that control chemosensory organs found in the tactile receptor systems, but it was not known, till now, whether they were linked to children’s picky eating habits.

Ms Cole and colleagues pinpointed the variants after selecting five particular genes related to the perception of taste.

They said other chemosensory factors such as odour, colour and texture may also affect eating behaviours as well.

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