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Lifestyle Health and Wellbeing 06 Oct 2017 Cure for Parkinson's ...

Cure for Parkinson's disease could be on the horizon

DECCAN CHRONICLE
Published Oct 6, 2017, 12:34 pm IST
Updated Oct 6, 2017, 12:36 pm IST
Find out what researchers discovered that could help provide treatment for the degenerative nerve condition.
Scientists may soon be able to treat Parkinson's disease. (Photo: Pexels)
 Scientists may soon be able to treat Parkinson's disease. (Photo: Pexels)

Scientists claim a cure for Parkinson's disease may soon be in the works, as experts have unlocked the secret to a brain enzyme responsible for the condition.

The study was conducted by researchers from the Dundee University. For years, PINK1 was said to be crucial in preventing the degenerative nerve condition, according to a report by the Daily Mail.

 

"The PINK1 gene was identified as a key player by researchers back in 2004,"Professor David Dexter, deputy director of research at Parkinson's UK told the Daily Mail. Adding, "Drugs that can switch the PINK1/parkin pathway back on may be able to slow, stop or even reverse nerve cell death, not only in people who have these rare inherited forms of the condition, but also those with non-inherited Parkinson’s."

The research helps scientists understand what the protein looks like and how changes in gene can prevent the PINK1 from working. "This knowledge is vital for developing drugs that can switch PINK1 back on, which has the potential to slow or even stop the progression of the condition, something current treatments are unable to do," Professor Dexter explained in the report.

The study could be the beginning of understanding how the enzyme can be used to provide treatment, including symptoms of the condition.

Co-author of the study Professor Daan van Aalten told the Daily Mail: "Our work now provides a framework to undertake future studies directed at finding new drug like molecules that can target and activate PINK1."

The study was originally published in the journal eLife.

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