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Lifestyle Health and Wellbeing 05 Oct 2018 Antibiotic may kill ...

Antibiotic may kill dangerous skin cancer cells, says study

PTI
Published Oct 5, 2018, 3:32 pm IST
Updated Oct 5, 2018, 3:32 pm IST
The research found nifuroxazide, showed promise for complementing existing melanoma therapies.
Within a single tumour there can be variation in the properties of the cells, with some more dangerous than others. (Photo: Pixabay)
 Within a single tumour there can be variation in the properties of the cells, with some more dangerous than others. (Photo: Pixabay)

London: An existing antibiotic may selectively kill dangerous cells within melanoma, the deadliest type of skin cancer, a study claims.

The research, published in the journal Cell Chemical Biology, found the drug, called nifuroxazide, showed promise for complementing existing melanoma therapies.

 

Researchers at the University of Edinburgh in the UK tested the drug's effect on melanoma cells in mice and samples from human tumours. They caution more research is needed to determine if it will be effective in people.

Within a single tumour there can be variation in the properties of the cells, with some more dangerous than others, in terms of their potential to support growth or become resistant to drug treatment. Many of the more dangerous cells in melanoma tumours produce a lot of an enzyme called aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1).

Current research into therapies has focused on blocking ALDH1, but in this study the researchers went a step further and aimed to selectively kill cells producing high ALDH1.

They used the drug nifuroxazide, an antibiotic, that is activated by the enzyme ALDH1, which means that it only becomes toxic once it is inside cells producing ALDH1.

Using samples of human melanomas implanted in mice the researchers showed that the nifuroxazide therapy killed the tumour cells that produced a lot of ALDH1, without significant toxicity to other cells in the body.

 The researchers hope that the strategy may complement existing melanoma treatments, called BRAF and MEK inhibitors. Currently, some people's tumours develop resistance to BRAF and MEK inhibitors and the researchers found that some of these resistant tumours were high in ALDH1. In the lab, the researchers simulated this by treating cancer cells lines with BRAF and MEK inhibitors, which increased the number of cells with high levels of ALDH1 and made the cells especially sensitive to nifuroxazide treatment.

"We've shown this antibiotic that's used mostly to target intestinal bacteria can also target and kill cancer cells high in the enzyme ALDH1," said Liz Patton from the University of Edinburgh.

"It's great that this antibiotic is approved for use in humans, but it wasn't designed as a cancer drug, so we still need to find out if it's safe and effective for cancer in humans -- for example, can it get to the cancer in the body and are the doses needed safe,"

said Patton.

"We may need to take the concept for how this antibiotic works and re-design it to make it better at killing cancer," Patton said.

 

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