140th Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra52451335842118050 Tamil Nadu3028752446755041 Andhra Pradesh2355251456362116 Karnataka182354991263312 Delhi1461341316574131 Uttar Pradesh126722767212120 West Bengal98459671202059 Bihar8274154139450 Telangana8075157586637 Gujarat71064542382652 Assam5883842326145 Rajasthan5249738235789 Odisha4592731785321 Haryana4163534781483 Madhya Pradesh3902529020996 Kerala3433121832109 Jammu and Kashmir2489717003472 Punjab2390315319586 Jharkhand185168998177 Chhatisgarh12148880996 Uttarakhand96326134125 Goa871259575 Tripura6161417641 Puducherry5382320187 Manipur3752204411 Himachal Pradesh3371218114 Nagaland30119738 Arunachal Pradesh223115923 Chandigarh1595100425 Meghalaya11154986 Sikkim9105101 Mizoram6203230
Lifestyle Health and Wellbeing 04 Dec 2019 Intervening to reduc ...

Intervening to reduce non-HDL cholesterol levels reverses signs of atherosclerosis

AFP
Published Dec 4, 2019, 2:07 pm IST
Updated Dec 4, 2019, 2:07 pm IST
Studies reveal that early cholesterol treatment lowers heart disease risk.
Non-HDL cholesterol is arrived at by subtracting a person's HDL level from their total cholesterol number. (Photo: AFP)
 Non-HDL cholesterol is arrived at by subtracting a person's HDL level from their total cholesterol number. (Photo: AFP)

Washington: Treating younger people with high cholesterol levels may help reduce their risk of heart attack or stroke in later life, a major study showed Wednesday. Described as the "most comprehensive" review of its kind covering almost 400,000 patients over more than 40 years, the study in The Lancet said its findings on the link between cholesterol levels and ill health "may be particularly important in people under 45 years."

A summary said that starting with the same cholesterol level and additional cardiovascular risk factors -- such as obesity or smoking -- men under 45 years faced a 29 per cent risk of fatal or non-fatal heart disease or stroke by the age of 75. For women, the risk level was 16 per cent. However, if their non-HDL (i.e. "bad") cholesterol levels were halved, typically by the use of statins, the men's risk came down to 6.0 per cent and women fell to just 4.0 per cent.

 

Additionally, the study showed that "intervening early and intensively to reduce non-HDL cholesterol levels... could potentially reverse early signs of atherosclerosis" -- the narrowing of the arteries caused by fat, calcium and cholesterol build-up. HDL -- High-Density Lipoprotein -- is often dubbed "good cholesterol," helping clear fat from the bloodstream, in contrast with "bad" Low-Density Lipoprotein.

Non-HDL cholesterol is arrived at by subtracting a person's HDL level from their total cholesterol number and accordingly measures all the bad lipoproteins. Commenting on the study, Jennifer Robinson of the University of Iowa said its long-term nature and size was important in pointing to the potential for early treatment.

 

It raised the possibility that those people with high non-HDL and LDL levels could be more at risk than suggested by the 10-year threshold currently used to determine if treatment is needed, Robinson noted. Paul Leeson, Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at the University of Oxford said the issue of long-term medication would have to be addressed.

"Exactly how to reduce cholesterol effectively in young people and, in particular, whether you would need to take drugs for decades to do this is not explored (in the study) but will be important to consider before these findings can be included into medical guidance," Leeson said in a commentary.

 

...




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT