Infertile men 3 times more likely to develop aggressive prostate cancer, says study

DECCAN CHRONICLE
Published Jul 3, 2018, 9:47 pm IST
Updated Jul 3, 2018, 9:47 pm IST
Researchers say undiagnosed prostate tumours may drive infertility, low testosterone levels could lead to development of both conditions.
The fertility treatment could therefore be used as a screening tool for prostate cancer diagnoses, according to the researchers. (Photo: Pixabay)
 The fertility treatment could therefore be used as a screening tool for prostate cancer diagnoses, according to the researchers. (Photo: Pixabay)

A new study now finds that infertile men are more likely to develop aggressive early-onset prostate cancer.

According to the Swedish study, those who are unable to have children naturally or via IVF are overall 47 per cent more likely to develop the life-threatening condition, while men under 50 have three times the risk.

 

Researchers say that undiagnosed prostate tumours may drive infertility, while low testosterone levels could lead to the development of both conditions.

Studies show that around 35 per cent of men have poor fertility while two per cent are unable to father children. 

The research, carried out at Lund University, analysed all fathers and their first born children in Sweden between 1994 and 2014.

Information was taken from birth, cancer and assisted reproduction registers.

The study saw fathers who underwent intracytoplasmic sperm injections (ICSI) being compared to those who became parents naturally or via IVF.

Results suggest men who have ICSI are at a significantly higher risk of early-onset prostate cancer but not late.

IVF does not influence men's risk of any type of the disease.

Speaking about it, study author Yahia Al-Jebari said that the increased risk of prostate cancer is definitely not because of the ICSI.

The fertility treatment could therefore be used as a screening tool for prostate cancer diagnoses, according to the researchers.

This comes after research released last March suggested infertile women are more than 50 per cent more likely to become pregnant if they are treated with two key hormones.

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