Lifestyle Health and Wellbeing 01 Jul 2019 Doctors make a diffe ...

Doctors make a difference every single day

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | DR ANJANA KANNANKARA
Published Jul 1, 2019, 1:47 am IST
Updated Jul 1, 2019, 1:47 am IST
This Doctor's Day, let us celebrate our physicians all over the world who have touched our lives in a special way.
Indian Medical Association
 Indian Medical Association

Each day, doctors impact the lives of patients and work hand-in-hand with a team of professionals to deliver the meaning of care. Through their actions from a simple bedside gesture to a life-saving procedure, doctors make a difference every day.

This Doctor's Day, let us celebrate our physicians all over the world who have touched our lives in a special way.

 

There’s little argument that it is tough being a physician these days. And let’s not forget that for all the challenges that come their way, there’s little or no recognition for the long days they spend and extra patience they show.

Attacks on doctors in India are increasing. So is in other parts of Asia, such as China, Pakistan, Nepal and Sri Lanka. An Indian Medical Association study shows 75 per cent of doctors in India have faced violence at some point in time.

The doctor-patient relationship has deteriorated so much that the physicians have become easy targets. The society accuses them of negligence or malpractice without seeking an expert opinion.

 

A couple of decades ago, doctors were most respected in society and treated next to God. But the alarming rise of private institutions raises concerns about quality healthcare.

A difference in knowledge, attitude and skills is noticeable between graduates from private and public medical colleges, which might reflect in patient care as well.

The governments never care about their benefits and job satisfaction and dump loads of extended working hours and patie-nts on them. Physicians are not immune to anxiety or depression.

The violence is unlikely to stop unless you go into its root cause. Citizens must be discouraged from taking the law into their hands. Security in hospitals must be beefed up, and people accompanying patients restricted.

 

Times have undoubtedly changed, and it demands better communication. The impatience and intolerance is a common trend in developing societies with swiftly changing socioeconomic structures.

Healthcare providers in India are grossly underprepared for this transformation. As a result, we now witness persistent discontent, aggression, and violence.

Let's not forget that doctors work round the clock saving lives of millions of people every day with minimum reward.

Let's us uphold the passion, dedication and devotion as generations have shown us- not for a source of income but their genuine love to serve!

 

(The author is director TGL Foundation, Editor -Anthropology Today, Sr Dir FWO)

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