Look what’s trending!

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | SIMRAN KAPUR
Published Jun 29, 2019, 7:28 am IST
Updated Jun 29, 2019, 7:28 am IST
The fashion industry thrives on creative minds and their new-age creations.
The entire collection was curated to the Indian palette and weather conditions.
 The entire collection was curated to the Indian palette and weather conditions.

If you’re confused about which designs and patterns you need to put your money on this fashion season or what fashion trends you need to follow, Elahé, the designer boutique in the city, has some ideas for you. The boutique, which celebrates its 20 years in the business, brought together designers from across the country under one roof to showcase their collections.

Exuding the feel of a ‘transition period’, the clothes that designers opted for had colours resonating with the weather around easy-breezy shades of blue featured on most racks as they prepared for the onset of the monsoons. Read on for some tips on the fashion trends.

 

Sustainable fashion
For some, the phrase reflects the longevity over popularity. Sustainable fashion means the luxury of spending on a piece of clothing that can be worn repeatedly and not to be packed off after its first outing. Like most things in fashion, this is one that’s making a comeback.

In fact, Elahé’s event itself saw many designers embrace the sustainable fashion trend as they recycled and re-used even the smallest of scraps, minimising any form of wastage. The entire collection was curated to the Indian palette and weather conditions, making it a fashion hub of ideas and concepts by varied designers.

Designers Priyadarshini Rao and Anupamaa Dayal with the owner of Elahé and the curator of the collection Smita Shroff (middle).Designers Priyadarshini Rao and Anupamaa Dayal with the owner of Elahé and the curator of the collection Smita Shroff (middle).

An ardent believer of sustainable fashion designer Priyadarshini Rao shares, “We need to be timeless as well in our designs and to be able to pick up what we’ve worn and wear it again without the fear of being outdated. Also, the idea of sustainability is a sentiment that Indians are incorporating fast — to have your signature style and make it sustainable and comfortable to wear.”

Colours that brighten up or tone down
While some designs on the racks showcased pastel and earthy shades still in line with the warm and humid weather, a few others embraced bright colours of the upcoming festive season.

While designer Anupamaa Dayal, who believes in the concept of happy women, shared that colour is a reflection of happiness and resonates with one’s mood, designer Neha Modi revealed she leaned towards comfort in her pieces. “Right now, we are focusing on tie-and-dyes and shades of blue while making sure that everything is wearable. I feel clothes should be simple and comfortable to wear with an edgy side to it,” she says.

Designers Aartivijay Gupta and Nupur Harwani  wearing their collection.Designers Aartivijay Gupta and Nupur Harwani wearing their collection.

Anti-fits and a cultural collaboration
Most designers are showing the door to fitted clothes. ‘Anti-fits’, which give a person space to breathe without taking away from their figure, is a trend that’s here to stay. And designer Aartivijay Gupta aims for just that with her latest collection.

Promoting anti-fits coupled with the use of comfortable fabric, her idea is to create a second skin for the customers. “Our latest designs showcase patterns and paintings seen on mud walls in villages across India. The concept is very rooted in our culture with the output being edgy and modern in appearance along with providing the desired comfort,” Aarti explains.

Designer Shahin MannanDesigner Shahin Mannan

Airport look
If you follow celebs on Instagram, you’d know that airport looks have been under the limelight for a while. Through her designs, Shahin Mannan showcases just that with a corporate touch. Shahin opts for muted shades of navy blue and olive greens while breaking the wall between the concept of men and women clothing.

“Women these days are not restricted by the traditional shades of pinks and yellows associated with the gender. Our choice of colours along with the structure of our clothes has seen quite the shift,” she states.

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