A visual allegory

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | RESHMI CHAKRAVORTY
Published Jun 28, 2019, 12:19 am IST
Updated Jun 28, 2019, 12:19 am IST
Sculptor Harshavardhan Durugadda’s is one of the artists whose work will be exhibited at Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi 2019, in Sydney, Australia.
Nimbus — the selected sculpture to be showcased at the 23rd Sculpture by the Sea, Sydney, Australia
 Nimbus — the selected sculpture to be showcased at the 23rd Sculpture by the Sea, Sydney, Australia

Art has always been known to transcend borders and bring people from across the world, tying them together in the creative bond. Now, Hyderabad’s Harshavardhan Durugadda’s sculptures are not only creatively inspiring everyone across the globe but also winning laurels for its unique concept and approach. Harshavardhan Durugadda is one of those artists whose sculpture will be exhibited at 23rd Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi 2019, in Sydney, Australia. Bondi’s annual exhibition is the largest public display exhibition in the world.

Harsha’s work has been selected from submissions of over 400 artists’ across 35 countries. This is the first time an Indian’s artwork has been selected for the exhibition third time in a row.

 

His sculpture, named Nimbus is what got him to the coveted platform. Incidentally, ‘nimbus’ is described as a dark grey cloud that often produces rain or snow. “The work is made in paint on steel and is inspired by cloud forms and captures the fleeting moment,” says Harsha.

Reaping rewards
Born in 1989, the artist works across disciplines of sculpture, performance and installation art. Harsha, 2017 winner of the Rio Tinto Sculpture Award for Column of Sound at Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe, Australia and in 2012, he was awarded the British Council fellowship for his social art project Loo Culture. Interestingly, Harsha’s selection is not the only crowning glory. The artist has also won the NordArt 2018 BIAFARIN award, and he is the only young Indian artist to win this award in NordArt.

Globe-trotter art
In the meanwhile, Harsha is busy with his large-scale sculpture, which will need three months to complete. “It takes a lot of hard work and time to not only conceptualise the sculpture but also to make it as it is a large-scale one. The visual allegory needs to be spot-on,” Harsha explains.

Talking of a global outreach, the artist, who has a PG Diploma in visual communication, feels it’s important for young artists to exhibit internationally and share space with talented artists from across the world. Is that why the artist hasn’t yet exhibited in Hyderabad? “I know it’s weird I haven’t yet showcased my work in Hyderabad. It’s because my work mostly travels across the globe to different art shows. But this time, I’m planning to have an exhibition here and am in talks with a gallery here. Hopefully, in another six months, we can come up with something interesting,” says Harsha as he signs off.

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