Portraying Ganesha in myriad art forms

DECCAN CHRONICLE
Published Nov 27, 2018, 12:28 am IST
Updated Nov 27, 2018, 12:28 am IST
It all started in the most unusual of fashions when, confined to a bed for a long period due to an injured foot, Sujata started to make drawings.
It all started in the most unusual of fashions when, confined to a bed for a long period due to an injured foot, Sujata started to make drawings.
 It all started in the most unusual of fashions when, confined to a bed for a long period due to an injured foot, Sujata started to make drawings.

Minister K. Pandian Rajan inaugurated a solo show by artist Sujata Bajaj (at the centre of the picture above with minister Pandian and Mrs. Latha Pandian) organised by Gallery Veda at Park Hyatt Chennai. The three-month long exhibition takes the creative forms and expressions through the figure of Ganesha, the elephant-headed, lovable god, by the artist using a diverse set of techniques as well as variety of materials. The exhibits consist of mixed media, painted fiberglass sculptures, drawings and etching-collages made over a 30-year period. The exhibition focuses on the hidden talent of an artist celebrated thus far as an abstract colourist.

Ganapati has been a lifelong preoccupation underpinning her journey as an artist. Speaking on her inspiration, the Indian origin artist (now settled in Paris) said, “To me, Ganapati is endless. I feel a sense of complete freedom and liberty in abstracting his image. No other form lends itself as vividly to the abstract as Ganapati. When I paint him or sculpt him, I am certainly not painting or sculpting a god. I am, in fact, through the process, experiencing my own artistic freedom, and the immense joy intrinsic to that freedom.”

 

It all started in the most unusual of fashions when, confined to a bed for a long period due to an injured foot, Sujata started to make drawings. She did this obsessively, as if guided by a power beyond her own, each new drawing building on the previous with some variation, but always pointing at the form of Ganapati. At a later stage, she added techniques and used materials to give the project depth and a variety rarely seen in Indian art.

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