Lifestyle Books and Art 19 Feb 2018 Quintessentially imp ...

Quintessentially impressionistic

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | PALAK DUBEY
Published Feb 19, 2018, 12:11 am IST
Updated Feb 19, 2018, 12:11 am IST
Abstract art maker Maruthi Paila says that life is not easy for an artist who paints in a non-figurative style.
Art by Maruthi Paila.
 Art by Maruthi Paila.

The present series of works by Maruthi Paila on display at The Gallery Cafe, titled Myriad Expressions, bring forth a mature and abstract version of realistic experiences absorbed by the artist. The fragmented and intricately divided spaces in the his paintings intrigue the viewer with their non-representational aspects.

A graduate in fine arts from Jawaharlal Nehru Architecture and Fine Arts University and postgraduate from Karnataka State Open University, Maruthi talks about his painting style, “I am very comfortable with my abstract style of painting. It is a natural extension of my earlier figurative works. I feel immensely satisfied in expressing myself in this manner; this is the language that originates from my heart. Figurative works are very popular and so, being an abstract artist is very challenging. Yet, I believe that a person who is ready to work hard is sure to find a way as many opportunities and avenues open for such persistent individuals.”

 

Maruthi’s works on display here exemplify a simple, uncluttered and bare play of ‘line’ and ‘colour’. The elements of painting get amalgamated onto the picture surface to create a composition which is simultaneously minimalistic and strong. There is no detailing of the forms and no intention to show direct connections with objects or ideas picked up from the real world. Line and colour get the deserved prominence, and thus become the initiators of emotional responses in the viewer. Innumerable lines run throughout the surface in varied directions, thus forming a unique grid-like pattern. On the other hand, the fragmented sections get balanced by the artist’s bold strokes and often the monotony of their lattice work is broken with deep, groove-like colour applications.

“My works are immensely inspired by aerial views which we see while travelling by a plane. After a certain distance, all the intricate details cease to be visible and many land forms get amalgamated into seamless patterns. The subtle gradations and changes in colour and hue enthrall me and I often create a similar visual experience in my paintings,” reveals Maruthi.

About the choice to pursue art as a profession, he says, “I was very lucky to be supported by my father about my decision to become an artist. He was a school teacher and a stage artist. His performances were memorable experiences for me and from there my relationship with fine arts got initiated; I became more passionate and deeply interested in it with the time.”

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