Jobs & Education 26 Oct 2021 Fee structure confir ...

Fee structure confirmed for professional courses in Andhra Pradesh

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | DC CORRESPONDENT
Published Oct 26, 2021, 7:13 am IST
Updated Oct 26, 2021, 7:22 am IST
The state government has fixed 70,000 as tuition fee for a private university located in a rental building in Anantapur
. Display of details of tuition fee, admission fee, university affiliation fee, infrastructure fee, college fee and other fee should be mandatory on the college websites. —  Representational image/DC
 . Display of details of tuition fee, admission fee, university affiliation fee, infrastructure fee, college fee and other fee should be mandatory on the college websites. — Representational image/DC

ANANTAPUR: The state government has confirmed the fee structure for B.Tech, B.Sc Agriculture, Horticulture,  Forestery,  B.Pharm and B.Arch courses
for the academic session 2021-22. The same fee structure shall be applicable to the next academic year, 2022-23, as well.

Students aspiring for admission through AP EAPCET 2021 counseling must note that the government will reimburse the full fee amount for those belonging to weaker sections such as EWS, SCs, STs and BCs.

 

This year, 35 per cent of B.Tech seats in private universities in AP shall be  filled under the convener quota of AP EAPCET 2021 counseling. The universities have already sent a tentative fee structure, and APSCHE has approved this under the convener quota. A total number of 2,330 B.Tech seats in 4 private universities are to be filled through AP EAMCET 2021 counseling.

The proposals were made for amendments to AP Private University Act, 2006, focusing on providing quality education to students who are socially and financially backward and fill 35 per cent seats under government quota in private universities.

 

All private universities have conducted Entrance Examinations in June and admitted students in July. Students admitted in various private universities have secured good ranks in EAPMCET. Now they are worried they may have to forego their fees should they choose to cancel their admissions and attend counseling sessions.
 
Experts say the State Council for Higher Education should stop private universities and autonomous bodies from doing this. Private universities and institutions should be allowed to conduct the admission process after government seats are exhausted. Otherwise, the admission process should be completed by July 31.
 
Information about the courses, affiliation, approvals and intake should be placed on the website. No university displays the course intake details. Display of details of tuition fee, admission fee, university affiliation fee, infrastructure fee, college fee and other fee should be mandatory on the college websites.
 
The state council for higher education should name an ombudsman with independent authority to look after the students’ grievances. Thousands of students have deposited their SSC, Intermediate, Diploma Marks memorandums and original degree certificates. M.Tech/ MCA/MBA students who have completed their course in 2019 have not received their provisional certificates, original Degree certificates and Marks Memos. The same is the case with B.Tech and Diploma students.
 
The state government has fixed 70,000 as tuition fee for a private university located in a rental building in Anantapur. Though this university started in 2017, it does not have infrastructure and has not gone for UGC inspections so far.
 
Over the last two decades, India has witnessed a rapid rise in the number of private universities. Various state governments have encouraged and justified this growth in order to increase enrolment in higher education, and private entities have welcomed this state encouragement. However, the implications of this move on access to higher education and the variety of other challenges that it presents are debated. Lack of vigilance by the government on universities led to a situation of these institutions having poor amenities.
 
This spectacular growth in the number of deemed universities decelerated after 2009 as a result of a decision of the MHRD to withdraw recognition of 44 deemed universities and to put an equally large number of institutions under the scanner, based on an assessment of their quality of education and management patterns.
 
Reports said the Supreme Court had quashed different provisions of the Chhattisgarh Private Universities (Establishment and Operation) Act, 2005, and had upheld the UGC (Establishment of and Maintenance of Standards in Private Universities) Regulations, 2003 (CED 2005; UGC 2003) in 2005.
 
By bringing better clarity regarding the legal framework for setting up and operating state private universities, this verdict encouraged both state governments and private capital to work on the establishment of state private universities. With the future of deemed universities unclear, private capital began gravitating towards state private universities. As a result, between 2006 and 2018, the number of state private universities swelled from 19 to 290.

 

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