Entertainment Tollywood 06 Dec 2019 Competition drives u ...

Competition drives us: Raashi Khanna

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | SURESH KAVIRAYANI
Published Dec 6, 2019, 12:45 am IST
Updated Dec 6, 2019, 12:45 am IST
Raashi Khanna talks about working in the South, her love for music, and how actresses are getting better roles now.
Raashi Khanna
 Raashi Khanna

Raashi Khanna may have made her debut with Hindi film Madras Cafe in 2013, but has since made a name for herself in the South. And unlike many others who continue to work in both industries, the actress admits that her commitments down South keep her busy.  

“It’s not like I don't want to do Hindi films or that I’m not trying for them, but it’s never been on my mind. South films have a very big reach today and I don’t need to go anywhere else,” says Raashi, who adds, “Hindi films may have a bigger reach, but that’s not my aim.”

 

The actress is clear that she wants to do only good roles. “The language and industry do not matter; I only want to do good roles. Moreover, I don’t want to sail in two boats,” she asserts, adding that Hyderabad is now home. “Yes, from the last four years, Hyderabad is my home and I am settled here,” she confirms.

Not many know that the actress likes to sing and has even sung a few songs earlier. “In fact, I wanted to become a singer when I was a child. But after growing up, my priorities changed and I became an actress,” says Raashi, adding, “But I still like singing as I learnt music when I was 7-years-old. Interestingly, the actress reveals that she will soon be singing a song in Telugu without divulging any more details.

Raashi concedes that competition exists everywhere. “Competition drives us to work hard,”  she says.
Reacting to the recent murder of the Hyderabad doctor, the actress says, “I am angry and scared. It’s very disgusting and their heads ought to be chopped off in front of people.”

She believes that all the actors in the industry should raise their voice to put pressure on the government. “That’s why I tweeted. All of us have a voice, and we must use it,” says the actress.

As for those blaming films for portraying women in bad light, Raashi disagrees. “It’s all in your head. There is no one definition for what is derogatory. People will always have opinions but ultimately, it’s about how you were brought up. There is no one answer to this question,” she says.

Emphasising on the importance of mindset, the actress adds, “Upbringing is key. Many films also carry a good message but we conveniently forget about it.”

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