Entertainment Sandalwood 12 Aug 2017 ‘Kanna’ choose y ...

‘Kanna’ choose your language!

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | REMYA SCARIA
Published Aug 12, 2017, 12:00 am IST
Updated Aug 12, 2017, 12:54 am IST
Local movie goers are happily lapping up films in regional languages.
A still from U-Turn
 A still from U-Turn

Gone are the days when watching a movie meant understanding the dialogues word for word. Language is no longer a barrier for youngsters in the city who are rooting for Kannada and other regional cinema! Film enthusiasts in the city divulge on their love for stories that are showcased through cinema, that know no barriers.

Off late, the Kannada film industry that has a reputation for “massy” films, has received appreciation for films with gripping plots. A new wave of filmmakers has brought on this change. A film like Lucia which was crowd funded, clearly indicates that people wanted quality films to be made. Content-oriented films like Tithi, Ondu Motteya Kathe, Ulidavaru Kandanthe, U-Turn and Kirik Party are topping the list of favourites.

 

The relatability factor with the characters in these films makes the stories a huge hit with the younger crowd. Sriniketh BR, an undergraduate student who loves watching regional Kannada cinema as well as Tamil, Telugu and Marathi says, “U-turn was a brilliant film. I loved the plot twists that kept me on the edge of my seat till the very end.  However common the storyline may be, every filmmaker’s point of view is completely different. Film releases with subtitles have made it easier for me to watch films in other languages as well, because I always hear good things about film made in other languages as well!”

 

The stories are usually simple and traditional but the nouveau way of retelling the story keeps them engaged. Ayman Hamzaki, a Literature graduate says, “A film like Ulidavaru Kandanthe has a classic plot but the way the filmmaker makes use of different perspectives to tell the same story made it a great film! The Kannada film industry has particularly come out with films that have great character depictions.” Film festivals like the Bangalore Film Festival have got the attention of youngsters as they bring the year’s best films to the screen. Sagar Puranik, a director says, “At the festivals, top films have been coming and language doesn’t matter because now the public have realised the value of good cinema. Everyone is interested in a particular element of a film that makes them want to see it.”

 

The entry of multiplexes in malls worked in the favour of new-age filmmakers whose films are brought to the Kannada speaking middle class audience. Shantharaju S, a film studies professor says, “Content-oriented films are the result of a collective movement. Regional filmmakers are influencing each other and there is an exchange of ideas.”

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