Aana Alaralodalaral movie review: Tried and tested

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | MEERA MANU
Published Dec 24, 2017, 3:01 am IST
Updated Dec 24, 2017, 3:01 am IST
Aanachandam, released in 2006, was perhaps the last time Malayalees got a full-time tusker tale on big screen.
A still from Aana Alaralodalaral
 A still from Aana Alaralodalaral

Cast: Vineeth Sreenivasan, Anu Sithara, Innocent, Suraj Venjaramood, Thesni Khan
Director: Dileep Menon
Rating: 2 stars

Aanachandam, released in 2006, was perhaps the last time Malayalees got a full-time tusker tale on big screen. Eleven years later, there is one more. With nothing much new to offer, Aana Alaralodalaral may sell this point to draw in the crowds. The movie shows a little girl and a boy in the beginning, friends of different faith. She turns to him to share her little joys. You know that they will grow up, fall in love with each other and get married before the two-hour screen time gets over. The script fulfils the viewers’ expectation without fail. Into this frame, a village, an elephant, a controversy, exile, separation, comeback, vengeance, misunderstanding, and repentance are fitted in, because Parvathy (Anu Sithara) and Hashim (Vineeth Sreenivasan) have to unite, fighting all odds and breaking all strictures.

 

As a child, Hashim is accused of stealing the talisman of Parvathy’s pet elephant Shekharankutty. How? There’s somebody’s evil intention behind it. Why? So that a corrupt temple official could tarnish the image of the boy’s Communist dad, who questions his wrongdoings. Out of shame, Hashim’s family leaves to another place (he will return, for sure) and his grandmother (Thesni Khan) throws cuss words at Parvathy’s dad before leaving. The movie tells how strong an expletive it is to reduce the affluent family to abject penury.

Hashim reappears as a rich guy who now owns Shekharankutty. The vexatious grandma insists on a religious conversion of the animal to kick up a set of events in the entire village. Whatever is said and done, Hashim has feeling for Parvathy. And the feeling is mutual. He resolves the years-old mystery surrounding the ‘lost’ talisman and wins his girl. Music does not have much role to attract the audience. If it all, there is something to entertain the audience, it is the lavish spread of humour — innuendos assured. Those satisfied with tried and tested tales of romance may enjoy.





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