Kalavu Thozhirchala movie review: Travels at a slow speed with predictable script

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | ANUPAMA SUBRAMANIAN
Published Sep 22, 2017, 5:05 pm IST
Updated Sep 22, 2017, 5:05 pm IST
Thiyagaraja’s camera aids the narration while Shyam Benjamin’s background score could have been better.
Still from the film.
 Still from the film.
Rating:

Director: Krishna Shamy

Cast: Kathir, Vamsi Krishna, Kushi, Kalanjium

 

Kalavu Thozhirchalai, which is about international smuggling of priceless rare Hindu ancient gods and goddesses’ idols, has hit the screens at a time the country is facing a big threat on the issue.

The story begins with an international criminal (Vamsi Krishna) known for his quirky modus operandi arriving at a village in Tanjore with the ulterior motive of smuggling the ancient Maragatha Lingam idol from Marundeeswarar Temple. He enters the temple in the pretext of a journalist who has come to research on temples. He takes the help of a local guy Sweet Ravi (Kathir) who is a smalltime thief who steals only Pillayar idols. Ravi wants to make big money and settle in life with his lover (Kushi). So, he agrees to go hand-in-glove with Vamsi and as per the latter’s plan, they steal the heavily guarded Lingam from the temple. Ravi gets his share of the spoils. Now enters Irfan (Kalanjium), a special police officer assigned to find the culprits. How he solves the case and brings them to books forms the rest.

For a genre like this, the screenplay should move at a racy pace. Sadly, the film with a predictable script travels at a slow speed. Vamsi Krishna does his part well. Kathir who is back after a gap is adequate, but the romance lacks luster.  And the way in which Kushi falls for a well known thief happens only in Kollywood. Kalanjium sporting a new look does justice to his role. Thankfully, the director has chosen to steer clear of violence, which is normally associated with such idol thefts – like killing the temple guards etc. Rather, Vamsi uses his brains to carry out the operation smoothly. Thiyagaraja’s camera aids the narration while Shyam Benjamin’s background score could have been better.

...




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT