Y movie review: A freshly brewed formula

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | MEERA MANU
Published Nov 19, 2017, 12:11 am IST
Updated Nov 25, 2017, 3:14 pm IST
It is an overnight turn-of-events, interspersed with two crime scenes, happening parallely over the same place at the same point of time.
Still from the movie.
 Still from the movie.
Rating:

Director: Sunil Ibrahim

Cast: Alencier Ley, Dheeraj Denny, Jins Baskar, Shini Ambalathodi

 

Some movies keep the viewers glued to the edge of their seats. Not just for a few minutes or during the climax scene, but from the beginning till the end. Y is one such film. With no breathtaking visuals, horror, action, adventure, drama or VFX to help, a team of really passionate filmmakers has proven that Malayalam cinema is a platform for experimenting freshly brewed formulae. Y, as it sounds, is many questions rolled into one, on the least-talked about social evils, neatly packed and presented in a less than two-hour thriller. 

It is an overnight turn-of-events, interspersed with two crime scenes, happening parallely over the same place at the same point of time. Nowhere does it feel like Hollywood or Bollywood and has people and milieu we come across every day. 

In what would have ended as a casual night out and shopping, a girl gets abducted in front of her boyfriend. Plot one starts rolling. All of a sudden, a big bad world of treachery and debauchery feels the tremor of this occurrence in a busy commercial-cum-residential complex, perceived to be inhabited by the ‘respectable’. That single night, forming plot two, is worth millions of unaccountable money to the kingpins involved. A crime-for-a-crime, an explored terrain is pictured so well in the movie.  

While watching this movie, every frame keeps rubbishing your presumptions and pre-conceived notions. Be patient till the end for the entire mystery to be solved. 

It would be a disrespect if the whole assessment of this movie goes without mentioning the captivating background score of Mejo Joseph that captures the mood of every frame with arresting precision. 

In the freshers’ outing, no face, other than Alencier Ley’s, is familiar to the audience at the start. In the process, every character leaves an indelible mark and signs off — from the screen, not from the mind.

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