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Entertainment Movie Reviews 12 May 2018 Kaamuki movie review ...

Kaamuki movie review: Of friendship and love

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | ELIZABETH THOMAS
Published May 12, 2018, 12:30 am IST
Updated May 12, 2018, 12:30 am IST
The movie sends out a message about friendship and love — that both should be pure and come from heart.
A still from the movie.
 A still from the movie.
Rating:

Cast: Askar Ali, Aparna Balamurali, Baiju, Akshara Kishor, Deepa Kartha
Director: Binu S.

Achaamma (Aparna Balamurali) is a queen of madness. Born in an auto rickshaw, she is an easy-going, lazy, curious, flirtatious girl, who is forced to vow to her father that she wouldn’t elope with anyone because her sister did so. Though she sticks to the pledge for a while, she is unable to resist her urge, and things turn upside down once she joins a college, where she meets Hari (Askar Ali). Aparna and Akshara — who plays Achaamma’s childhood — have given a memorable act. Although we have seen Nazriya Nazim in a similar portrayal in Om Shanthi Oshana before, Aparna’s performance is afresh. She lives as that character.

 

Askar Ali, who plays the role of a flirtatious but good-hearted guy with a disability, too has done a good job. But he could have taken better care of dialogue delivery as it sounds unnatural at many places. Though he’s there only for a few scenes, Baiju has shined as the father of Achaamma. Another talent that deserves mention is the actor who did the role of Hari’s best friend.   The movie tries to be progressive, but as the plot develops, it becomes a little regressive. Even the lead character loses her quirkiness and treads the traditional path. She becomes a conventional ‘Kaamuki’. It could have been a different viewing experience if the writer had let Achaamma tackle the dilemma in her quirky way. She could become weak because she is human, but we feel her energy drains away totally, leaving her exhausted.

 

But, the movie has its moments, especially between Hari, his friend, and Achaamma. Hari tells Achaamaa love shouldn’t be forced on someone. At the same time we see James, the wealthy man, working as a peon in the college with the intention of marrying a beautiful girl follows Jeena, Achaamma’s friend, asking for her hand. A little contradictory. Also, the movie follows the new law, displaying the disclaimer ‘violence against women is a punishable crime under the law’, whenever Achaamma gets beaten up. The movie sends out a message about friendship and love — that both should be pure and come from heart. It also touches upon the need of getting the ‘right education’ and treating fellow beings fairly. There is humour, but they could have trimmed down some cliché campus characters or scenes to make it crisp. The songs are good, especially the Kurumbi song by Shreya Jayadeep.

 

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