Peranbu movie review: Intense and hard hitting

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | ANUPAMA SUBRAMANIAN
Published Feb 1, 2019, 2:46 pm IST
Updated Feb 1, 2019, 2:46 pm IST
Shedding his megastar tag, Mammooty with his terrific screen presence, has delivered a knockout performance.
A still from Peranbu.
 A still from Peranbu.
Rating:

Director: Ram

Cast: Mammootty, Sadhana, Anjali, Anjali Ameer

 

Director Ram is one filmmaker who is in no hurry to add more numbers to his kitty. Rather, he prefers to wait for the right script and make meaningful cinema and when it happens, it is intense and hard hitting. His latest brilliant piece of art named Peranbu is no different, and it involves a subject and an approach, which has never been touched upon in Tamil cinema.

The movie opens with Amudhavan (Mammootty) moving to a quiet and isolated place with his child Paapa (Sadhana) who suffers from spastic paralysis.  His wife has left him for a better life, and now Amudhavan who was neglecting Pappa right from her birth is forced take care of her. Even as he struggles to cope up with his daughter, Paapa attains puberty, which makes Amudhavan’s task all the more tough. As they slowly start to warm up, then enters Vijayalakshmi (Anjali) who says she is an orphan and willing to take care of Pappa.

Meanwhile, Amudhavan and Vijayalakshmi get married. Soon, unexpected turn of events pushes Amudhavan and Paapa to return to the city. However, the real challenge begins for Amudhavan as he has to deal with Paapa’s sexual urge that is normally associated with teenage years. Another adjacent piece involves this compassionate transgender Meera (Anjali Ameer) who comes into the life of Amudhavan. The reminder of the film is an against-all-odds type scenario where Amudhavan has to cross each hurdle, with the movie ending in a positive note.

The way Ram, the master story teller unfolds the narrative flow giving chapter wise breaks relating each with nature –like nature is wonderful, nature is cruel, nature is unpredictable, nature is dangerous, nature is endless, and nature has no laws– makes you feel as if you are reading a great book. The director had earlier said that he wanted Mammooty as a performer for the role of Amudhavan rather than a star and waited for his dates. His wait has rewarded him rich dividends. Yes, shedding his Megastar tag, Mammooty with his terrific screen presence has delivered a knockout performance. The actor has only minimal dialogues, but his mere presence in a scene conveys several emotions. It is evident that Sadhana has worked hard to nail the complex character. Anjali in a role with shades of grey does a neat job, but it is Ram’s writing that justifies her character. For that matter, most of Ram’s characters are portrayed in an erred manner in one way or other, but once again he tries to prove a point drawing reference to nature- that it is but natural.

Anjali Ameer, the transgender who has debuted in Tamil essays a vital role, which actually sums up the theme. Ram should be lauded for portraying a trans-woman in a positive and gracious manner. Others in the supporting cast include Samuthirakani, Vadivukkarasi, Paval Navageethan and Livingston.

Yuvan Shankar Raja’s music and Theni Eshwar’s cinematography elevate the film several notches. Yuvan’s rerecording warrants mention and songs appeasing to aural nerves.

Through Peranbu, Ram drives home a point that the differently abled do not need our sympathy but are instead treated as normal persons, showering plenty of love. Your eyes will well up due to happiness when you come out of the cinema halls as Peranbu (Abundant Love) will make you a better human being, as you would feel gifted to posses a body without frailties. A must watch film!

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