Freedom of choice or icon of oppression?

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | OISHANI MOJUMDER
Published Feb 13, 2019, 12:01 am IST
Updated Feb 13, 2019, 12:04 am IST
A R Rahman’s daughter being trolled over her niqab has sparked off a debate on woman’s sartorial choices.
Raheema, Khatija and Ameen pose for Hello magazine’s debutante ball.
 Raheema, Khatija and Ameen pose for Hello magazine’s debutante ball.

What should have been a moment of celebration gave way to an unpleasant sideshow for Oscar-winning composer A. R. Rahman and his daughter Khateeja Rahman recently. The father and daughter duo ended up receiving way more than what they bargained for at the 10 year celebration of the maestro’s Slumdog Millionaire album, after social media erupted in anger and indignation over Khateeja wearing a niqab during an interaction on stage with her father.

While Rahman clarified that the niqab was not imposed on the women of his family and it was Khateeja’s choice to wear one, many on the Internet disagreed, claiming that the niqab is still an icon of oppression.

 

Padma Shri awardee and social worker Laila Tyabji commented on the issue with a Facebook post that read, “I support A. R. Rahman’s daughter’s right to wear an all-enveloping veil on her wedding but I mourn it.

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