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Entertainment Kollywood 21 Jul 2019 A kiss is an emotion ...

A kiss is an emotion: Vijay Devarakonda

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | ANUPAMA SUBRAMANIAN
Published Jul 21, 2019, 12:00 am IST
Updated Jul 21, 2019, 1:22 am IST
The actor speaks his mind on the lip-lock and more in an exclusive interview with dc.
When we  cry, it is an emotion. Similarly, a kiss is also an emotion.  It is such an intimate private emotion that appears in a crucial segment in the film  — Vijay Devarakonda
 When we cry, it is an emotion. Similarly, a kiss is also an emotion. It is such an intimate private emotion that appears in a crucial segment in the film — Vijay Devarakonda

Kissing is a beautiful emotion and I feel it is demeaning to term it lip-lock," the hot and happening Vijay Devarakonda said. The star, who was in the city along with his co-star Rashmika Mandana, cleared the air with his view when asked about kissing scenes in film after film in which he acts.

Vijay D seemed not to relish when constant queries arose on his kissing scenes. "I don't like the word lip-lock. You don't call a hug chest touch. It is just a warm expression.  I wonder the same critics who complain about objectification, call a kiss as lip-lock. When we cry, it is an emotion. Similarly, a kiss is also an emotion.  It is such an intimate private emotion that appears in a crucial segment in the film."

 

Vijay D is not bashful when reminded of his massive fan following, especially the females who form a major proportion. "I think in life, in the end what all of us want is to be 'loved'. It is nice to receive it from so many people. On social media, it is different. They are behind some screen and expressing themselves. But there are times when it really affects me and moves me.

Like the show in Bengaluru, I was in the green room and getting ready for the show.

We could accommodate 2,000 to 2,500 people and entry was free. Since it was raining, we had it in an indoor stadium. For multiple reasons 8,000 people turned up and they could not control the crowd. We were scared of a stampede. When I went out and saw those people, I felt a mixture of guilt.  So many have come and I am not able to accommodate them and I felt emotional as I saw people crying, it was really scary. When I see it live, it is hard to digest and makes you choke. The 'macho' man in you shatters and you become like a kid. But in the end it is beautiful to get so much love."  In an aside, he said that marriage is not going to take place anytime soon.

 

People mistake Dear Comrade  as a film that speaks about communism, but it is not, he says.  "I play a student leader and I fight for something in my college. Comrade means someone who's your companion, who is very supportive in good and bad times. This film talks about everyone having to fight for what he/she wants. I have fought for money, basic survival and respect and now fighting to be where we are."

He says Nota exhausted him. "I had to work really hard. I know with senior actors like Sathyaraj and Nasser, I can't screw up.  If the film were a huge success, it would have refueled me. I would have accepted more Tamil films. The reason is I am not in command in Tamil, as I don't have the power of the language. But, I felt I wouldn't be able to do it all over again (shrugs).  So, I didn't take offers that poured my way post-Nota. So, it is very important especially in our industry where the actors are the face of the movie and pull people to the theaters, you stick to the movie and understand everything and ensure all goes well."

 

What made you apologise then, we ask. "Normally I don't apologise.  Films are made and they work or they don't work. I just felt I woke up in the morning and wrote a letter on my phone and post this on social media. It was just I felt that way that morning. It depletes me of my energy, but it doesn't shake me. I came without fans, family, money and audience, but I made it and I know that tomorrow I will make it again, maybe from scratch.

But I know that I can do it myself. It was out of anguish, I posted that message. Anyways, past is past," he says even as he laughs.

 

We could accommodate 2,000 to 2,500 people and entry was free. Since it was raining, we had it in an indoor stadium. For multiple reasons 8,000 people turned up and they could not control the crowd. We were scared of a stampede. When I went out and saw those people, I felt a mixture of guilt.  So many have come and I am not able to accommodate them and I felt emotional as I saw people crying, it was really scary. When I see it live, it is hard to digest and makes you choke. The 'macho' man in you shatters and you become like a kid. But in the end it is beautiful to get so much love."  In an aside, he said that marriage is not going to take place anytime soon.

 

People mistake Dear Comrade  as a film that speaks about communism, but it is not, he says.  "I play a student leader and I fight for something in my college. Comrade means someone who's your companion, who is very supportive in good and bad times. This film talks about everyone having to fight for what he/she wants. I have fought for money, basic survival and respect and now fighting to be where we are."

He says Nota exhausted him. "I had to work really hard. I know with senior actors like Sathyaraj and Nasser, I can't screw up.  If the film were a huge success, it would have refueled me. I would have accepted more Tamil films. The reason is I am not in command in Tamil, as I don't have the power of the language. But, I felt I wouldn't be able to do it all over again (shrugs).  So, I didn't take offers that poured my way post-Nota. So, it is very important especially in our industry where the actors are the face of the movie and pull people to the theaters, you stick to the movie and understand everything and ensure all goes well."

 

What made you apologise then, we ask. "Normally I don't apologise.  Films are made and they work or they don't work. I just felt I woke up in the morning and wrote a letter on my phone and post this on social media. It was just I felt that way that morning. It depletes me of my energy, but it doesn't shake me. I came without fans, family, money and audience, but I made it and I know that tomorrow I will make it again, maybe from scratch. But I know that I can do it myself.

It was out of anguish, I posted that message. Anyways, past is past," he says even as he laughs.

 

...




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