Entertainment Kollywood 12 Feb 2020 ‘I always want ...

‘I always wanted to do a Sci-fi film’

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | GOKUL M.G
Published Feb 12, 2020, 12:00 am IST
Updated Feb 12, 2020, 1:58 am IST
“My role in Ayalaan is more about action than words”, says Isha Koppikar
Isha Koppikar
 Isha Koppikar

Sci-fi is not a popular genre in the Indian film industry. For that reason, Sivakarthikeyan’s film Ayalaan made headlines. After it went on floors in early 2018, the project has been delayed. But film buffs were filled with excitement after Isha Koppikar, who had a short but worthy stint in the South in the late 90s and early 2000s, joined the team. Isha talks candidly to DC on her comeback movie and her memories of working with some of the best names in the industry.    

You are making a comeback with Ayalaan. How did it get your attention?  
Ayalaan is a sci-fi movie and I have never been part of one. I was really excited. The team is also fantastic. Sivakarthikeyan, Rakul Preet Singh, there are a lot of talented artistes involved in it. I started my career down south with En Swasa Kaatre directed by K.S Ravi. I have fond memories of that film. The music was composed by A.R. Rahman. And for Ayalaan also, A.R Rahman is there. So yeah maybe I was kind of biased towards him.

 

What is your character in the film?  
The role that I was offered was something that I always wanted to do. It is an action-packed flick and I have a lot of action sequences. My character is called Eliza and she is more of an assassin. She is more about action than words. The action choreography in this film is really something.  

You were part of many great projects with many great faces in the industry. What do you think about the present filmmaking?
I think things have become more professional, with a lot of corporates coming in. The pre-production phase has changed a lot and the homework that goes into work, the content, all that has become more professional than it used to be.

Do you miss movies like Krishna Cottage, Darling, Don, Kyaa Kool Hai Hum and Narashima?  
Yes, I miss them in a sense that I had a wonderful time working in those films. They left me with very fond memories. Krishna Cottage, Don and Kyaa Kool Hai Hum did well at the box office and my characters were celebrated back then. But one has to move on. Once you finish the film you get out of the skin of that character and move to the next. What stays is the memories.

You were never afraid of speaking out about the atrocities in the industry, especially what female artistes had to face. Do you think nowadays artistes are not speaking up because they are afraid of losing opportunities?  
We are artistes, creative people, and we don’t really want to get entangled in unnecessary controversies, so most of the time we don’t speak up.

You are also into politics. How is it working out for you?  Do you think actors must have a political stance of their own or work for the betterment of the nation?  
Being attached to a political alliance or having a political stance would not deter even a famous actor from acting in a particular movie. If your name sells in the box office, your political alliances would not matter. If you are good at what you do, and have a good name in the industry, you will be cast in films. I always wanted to help society because I feel as actors, we can influence more people. People look up to us. I entered politics as I wanted to channel my efforts in an organized way.

What has been your inspiration through the years?
I am very passionate about my work and I believe in hard work. Like fitness, acting has no limit. There’s always a goal in front of you to achieve. I am very passion-driven.

...




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT