Entertainment Bollywood 19 Jul 2017 Trolls tell 'ma ...

Trolls tell 'malnourished' Deepika to 'eat something' after recent picture

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | JULIE SAM
Published Jul 19, 2017, 12:21 am IST
Updated Jul 19, 2017, 1:12 pm IST
Deepika Padukone being trolled for her frame, in an instance, proves that thinness isn’t a privilege.
Deepika Padukone’s Instagram post
 Deepika Padukone’s Instagram post

There’s no pleasing anybody. That’s probably the takeaway, going by the furore on Deepika Padukone’s recent Instagram post. Trolls had a field day on social media after the actress put up a photo of herself in a black slip dress  from the Vanity Fair photoshoot. However, not everyone was impressed.

In no time, an army of keyboard warriors descended to post nasty    comments on the upload, with some trolls criticising Deepika for looking “starved,” “malnourished” and “anorexic” others took the opportunity to advise her to eat better. One comment read, “I think ur still missing RS (Ranveer Singh) and going in depression…Get over it n eat something… (sic).” Only last month, telly actress Aneri Vajani was skinny-shamed for posting a photo of herself in a lingerie with comments stating that she was “too thin to live”.

 

At a time when fat shaming is increasingly slammed, thinness is perceived as a privilege. Celebrity trainer Leena Mogre, who has trained Kareena Kapoor Khan, Katrina Kaif, Madhuri Dixit Nene, Kangana Ranaut, and Salman Khan, rubbishes the claim that Deepika is anorexic or unhealthy. “Deepika falls somewhere between an ectomorph, which means someone who is usually petite and underweight, and a mesomorph, which refers to an athletic body type,” she states.  

Ask 26-year-old Neelima Sadanand, the media professional has been bearing the brunt of her high metabolism rate for as long as she can remember. “I’ve been called Lilliput and ‘flat-screen’ a lot of times. she rues.

 

Neelima adds that the popular culture opinion — ‘thin is desirable’ has made it difficult for people of her body-type to break the notion.

Psychotherapist Khyati Birla says that these unfiltered, casual comments can often lead to self-esteem issues, and peer pressure to have a certain type of body. She recounts now 40-year-old friend, who has been skinny all her life. “She has the ideal body fat percentage, but the comments were so caustic that she had been battling self-esteem issues all her life,” she says.

 

Nutritionist Karishma Chawla says that skinny shaming can also translate into physical problems — “People not only suffer from low self-esteem but also often have very low energy levels. Many of them have tried eating as much as they can, with no results.”

In 2015, actress Parineeti Chopra, who was regularly slammed for being unhealthy, surprised one and all with her fitter avatar. To celebrate her new body, she unveiled a photoshoot with captions like “Lost excuses and found results”.

Khyati adds that our cultural conditioning is such that women are always going to be weighed down under the shadow of the “perfect body.” “Unfortunately, we belong to a society that confuses honesty with bluntness. They have very high standards of beauty, and a very flawed one, if I can say that. It’s high time, we look beyond these conventional standards and beauty types and really celebrate who we are — neither of us have to be apologetic about our looks,” she concludes firmly.
         
—With inputs from Dyuti Basu

 

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