Entertainment Bollywood 17 Aug 2016 Karan and Ronnie mos ...

Karan and Ronnie most powerful people in industry: Parineeti Chopra

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | MEHUL S THAKKAR
Published Aug 17, 2016, 12:25 am IST
Updated Aug 17, 2016, 5:19 pm IST
The project also aims at creating new movie theatres and provide more economical movie-watching options to the masses.
Parineeti Chopra
 Parineeti Chopra

As an ever-increasing industry that generates crores of rupees in revenue, Bollywood is faced by a rather peculiar problem of a shortage of movie theatres.

Despite India being a movie-loving nation, people in certain parts of the country have to travel for several hours to reach a movie theatre, and with the current count of available screens, two big releases can’t even collide with each other for the fear of cannibalising earnings. This is all set to change now.

 

Bollywood biggies like Karan Johar and Ronnie Screwvala, as well as other leading forces are reportedly coming together to fight the multiplex monopoly, by bringing smaller multiplex chains to the fore. The project also aims at creating new movie theatres and provide more economical movie-watching options to the masses. Also rooting for the cause is actress Parineeti Chopra.

“We have always tried to introduce reforms in departments we’re lacking in,” says Pari, “Karan and Ronnie are the most powerful people in the industry; if not them, who else will (make a change).”

According to some figures, the number of screen releases our biggest movies get, can be compared to the limited movie releases in China and the disparity is glaring. Parineeti, however, believes that there’s no need for comparison. “It’s different; we shouldn’t compare. China is a different country and India is different. Of course the lack of theatres could be one of the reasons but we are still the biggest industry in the world. Why is that? The kind of money Bollywood makes is unprecedented — only second to Hollywood; I think we’re doing very well for ourselves.”

She adds further, “We’re a sizeable country; we’re an emotional country and we want to watch all films. We don’t have enough theatres, but we’re making them, we’re getting there. We’re a 70-year-old country and we should give ourselves some credit for getting where we are today”.

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