Entertainment Bollywood 16 Jul 2017 We share more than j ...

We share more than just skin colour: Adnan Siddiqui

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | SUBHASH K JHA
Published Jul 16, 2017, 12:45 am IST
Updated Jul 16, 2017, 12:45 am IST
Adnan speaks about the rapidly deteriorating relations between India and Pakistan.
Adnan Siddiqui
 Adnan Siddiqui

Although Mom, the emotional thriller, was primarily a Sridevi film, Pakistani actor Adnan Siddiqui, too, managed to make an impact. In an interview, Adnan speaks about the rapidly deteriorating relations between India and Pakistan and why artists from both the countries need to rise above politics.

Mom opened with encouraging reviews for you and Sajal Ali in India. How has it been received in Pakistan?
A good product is well-received everywhere. People in Pakistan have loved the film and are ecstatic about the collaboration between the two nations.

 

Unfortunately, you and Sajal Ali could not be a part of the movie’s promotion and release. Did you miss being in Mumbai for the opening of your film?
Obviously, it is a sad feeling when you are not able to promote a project you have spent days and nights working on. But then you are relieved that the promotion lies in more than capable hands with the likes of Srideviji, Nawazuddin Siddiqui and Akshaye Khanna.

Before you, Fawad Khan and Mahira Khan could not be in India for the release of their big films. How do you look at this situation where artistes from Pakistan are being left out of their moment of glory? Is there a growing sense of resentment among Pakistani artists for this state of isolation?
I wouldn’t go as far as saying there’s resentment to this situation. But I would agree it is hurting the relations between the artistes of both the countries. Politics may steer situations in any direction, but the people of both countries love and respect art for what it is. They don’t see passports when they purchase a ticket; they see a film.

 

Political relations between the two countries have deteriorated to such an extent that the cultural ties are threatened. What do you feel about the impasse between the two countries and how it can be resolved?
No matter how hard people try, our cultural ties will come out strong. We share more than just the colour of our skins; we share history, values and customs. It is just a matter of time when we will start sharing our artists, directors, writers and technicians on a broad scale too. I honestly believe we can find peace in art. 

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