Business Market 30 Mar 2020 Asian shares extend ...

Asian shares extend losses as toll from pandemic surges

REUTERS
Published Mar 30, 2020, 9:15 am IST
Updated Mar 30, 2020, 1:21 pm IST
Dollar suffered its biggest weekly decline in more than a decade last week
Representative Image (AFP)
 Representative Image (AFP)

HONG KONG: Asian markets fell Monday following a steep drop on Wall Street as the jubilation from last week's enormous US stimulus package faded and investors returned their attention to the soaring infection and death rate of the coronavirus.

Donald Trump finally signed off the more than $2 trillion pump-priming measures on Friday, but equities which enjoyed a rally for much of the week -- ended on a negative note as dealers took profits.

 

While the disease ravages populations and the global economy grinds to a halt with 40 percent of the planet in lockdown, experts are struggling to get a grip on the scale of the crisis that is forecast to cause a worldwide recession.

And analysts say there are likely more dark days ahead, with Trump abandoning his timetable for life returning to normal in the United States and extending emergency restrictions for another month.

The president said he expected the country to "be well on our way to recovery" by June 1 dropping his previous target of mid-April.

 

Meanwhile, senior US scientist Anthony Fauci issued a tentative prediction that COVID-19 could claim up to 200,000 lives in the US.

Governments and central banks have acted to shore up the global economy, pledging around $5 trillion in stimulus support, with China on Monday joining the party by lowering bank borrowing costs and pumping billions of dollars into financial markets, while Singapore also eased rates.

AxiCorp's Stephen Innes said markets looked like they were "nearing policy fatigue where it becomes less effective, and as the surprise element diminishes, no one cares".

 

He also pointed out that with the corporate reporting season approaching "now we are about to enter a vortex of bad earnings, bad economic data, and bankruptcies."

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