No end to RTE worries: Admissions delayed

DECCAN CHRONICLE
Published Dec 27, 2015, 12:54 pm IST
Updated Mar 26, 2019, 2:22 pm IST
Government yet to respond to High Court ruling denying quota in LKG classes.
Representational image
 Representational image
Bengaluru: Thousands of parents, who want their children to get admitted to the LKG/UKG classes in private unaided schools under the Right to Education (RTE) quota, are now worried, as the government is yet to take any decision in the wake of Karnataka high court’s interim order restraining admissions to LKG and UKG classes under RTE quota. 
 
According to the parents and activists admissions to LKG/ UKG classes more sought after than first standard. “Majority of the schools in the city have LKG as the entry point class. Even the parents and children prefer those schools. Now the state government must try to get this interim stay vacated,” urged Nagasimha G Rao of the RTE task force. “If children get admission to LKG, then by the time they reach Std I they acquire good language skills expected in private schools. It is easy for both children and school to get adjusted. If entry point is kept at Std I, it is difficult for the teachers in the schools to teach them everything right from basics. In such a scenario, a student needs to be given extra attention which will again lead to one or the other problem. Keeping in mind the academic interest of everyone, LKG should be the entry point under RTE,” he explained. 
 
Meanwhile Department of Public Instruction (DPI) which is planning to kickstart the RTE admission procedure for the academic year 2016-17 is expected to seek central government’s advice over the issue. “Many states have kept LKG as the entry point. Generally most of the private schools in the city do not give any extra admission in Std I, saying it has full strength from LKG itself. In such a scenario, how private schools having LKG as the entry point can accommodate 25% students at Std I?” said an officer on condition of anonimity.
 
25% quota:
 
Meanwhile, several intellectuals have questioned the state government’s policy of admitting 25% students under RTE quota. “Many intellectuals, including text book review committee chairman Prof. Baragoor Ramachandrappa, have already petitioned the state government seeking abolition of 25% quota in private schools as government is forced to spend hundreds of crores every year on those seats. Instead they want government to spend same money towards the improving the condition of government schools. However, parents are against it,” Rao added.

 

 

 

 

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Location: Karnataka




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