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Flamboyant display of colours in Delhi-based artist's show

PTI
Published Nov 25, 2015, 8:38 pm IST
Updated Mar 26, 2019, 11:33 pm IST
The artist explores expressive linear gestures and unique textures in her abstract acrylic paintings
An acrylic painting by Rashmi Sikand, (Picture Courtesy: Facebook)
 An acrylic painting by Rashmi Sikand, (Picture Courtesy: Facebook)
 
New Delhi: When a multitude of colours explodes creating a flamboyant mayhem on canvas, it creates an illusion of energy and positivity, often exuding happiness. Delhi-based artist Rashmi Sikand Yadav delves into this illusional space by exploring expressive linear gestures and unique textures in her abstract acrylic paintings, intending to portray a sense of unbridled happiness.
 
43 of her art works in three different mediums will be on display in an exhibition titled "Ascension: An Ode to Expression and Movement," that begins today at India Habitat
Centre here. Proficient in three mediums - acrylic, ink and charcoal - Yadav is a self taught artist whose works reflect spontaneity to create an emotional impact of colours, texture, light, atmospheric condition and composition of ground and space. "My abstract landscapes are interpretations of what I see around me. The series is about expression and movement and rhythm, pattern and process describe the essence of my work," she says.
 
Seeming to originate from a central point, her work in acrylic on canvas displays a liberal use of vibrant colour and multiple layering techniques offering vivacity to the art work.
"I also believe that colour can influence and transform the human experience. I see colours in everything and colours make me happy. I don't look at things black and white. I think the best expression is through colours," she says. Drawing inspiration from nature and her own emotions, she brings alive the beauty of evoking surprise by mixing
pigments, as she captures the momentum of life itself.
 
"The centre being the heart, the core, like a seed from where everything just goes haywire. Once it starts from a particular place, it is infinite," she says. Discarding the conventional method of fixing a canvas on an easel while painting, the 47-year-old artist who calls herself an active painter, likes to lay it flat on the table in order to have a multi-dimensional access to it. She moves it around, working from each side and angle until the painting is complete.
 
She says, working in this manner, "allows me the freedom to engage in the piece in its entirety and not just from one perspective. It helps me connect with the composition." Her work in ink displays her affinity for fine line drawings.
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