Wimbledon’s Indian summer

DECCAN CHRONICLE
Published Jul 14, 2015, 1:02 pm IST
Updated Mar 28, 2019, 1:23 pm IST
Wimbledon was also memorable for India with an unprecedented three doubles titles
Sania Mirza and Martina Hingis beat Russia's Ekaterina Makarova and Elena Vesnina 5-7 7-6 (7-4) 7-5 in a thrilling women's doubles final at the Wimbledon. (Photo: AP)
 Sania Mirza and Martina Hingis beat Russia's Ekaterina Makarova and Elena Vesnina 5-7 7-6 (7-4) 7-5 in a thrilling women's doubles final at the Wimbledon. (Photo: AP)

Novak Djokovic is putting some distance between himself and the rest. In quelling the sublime challenge of Roger Federer, the 29-year-old Serbian makes it clear he is head and shoulders above competition. With a third Wimbledon title, which he dedicated to his coach Boris Becker, and ninth grand slam title, Djokovic is headed to challenge all records. There is something about the power of the Serbian’s game that has seen him vault past greats like Rafael Nadal and Andy Murray as the legendary Federer is a fading force on surfaces other than Wimbledon grass. If not for an inexplicable meltdown against Stanislas Wawrinka in the French Open final, he would have been in line for a calendar grand slam not achieved since Rod Laver’s time.

Wimbledon was also memorable for India with an unprecedented three doubles titles coming the way of Sania Mirza, the stalwart Leander Paes, and the colt Sumit Nagal, who shared the boys’ crown with his Vietnamese partner. This should inspire Indian sportspersons. The modern athlete seems better prepared to take on international sport. The incentives, in terms of rewards, and some improvement in infrastructure mean today’s sportspeople have a far better chance than their predecessors. The possibilities are even more immense in individual sport and the portals have just been opened by these champions.

 

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