Mystic Mantra: A divine dialogue

DECCAN CHRONICLE
Published Jul 10, 2015, 12:30 pm IST
Updated Mar 28, 2019, 2:28 pm IST
If divinity is everywhere, the resultant song can only be divine
Lord Krishna gives the holy discourse of Bhagvad Gita to Arjuna
 Lord Krishna gives the holy discourse of Bhagvad Gita to Arjuna

We all know that the Bhagavad Gita is Lord Krishna’s teaching to Arjuna. Once, a person told me, “Swamiji, I know the Gita — the book that Arjuna taught Krishna!”
“No,” I corrected him, “it is the other way round.” “What difference does it make — who taught whom!” he retorted.

True, as far as knowledge is concerned, the identities of the teacher and student, to a certain extent, are inconsequential. However, in the case of the Gita, it is of the utmost importance. We cannot say Arjuna taught Lord Krishna.

 

What makes the Gita so special and unique? In Chapter 10 of the Gita, the Lord declares that He is the source of everything and when we see something powerful — it is His special glory. Logically, if divinity is everywhere, the resultant song can only be divine. This is the first specialty: Since the teacher, the student, the composer and the writer were all divine, the consequent creation is, naturally, divine. Therefore, the Gita is divine knowledge given by none other than Divinity Incarnate.

Swami Tejomayananda, head of Chinmaya Mission Worldwide, is an orator, poet, singer, composer and storyteller. To find out more about Chinmaya Mission and Swamiji, visit www.chinmayamission.com. © Central Chinmaya Mission Trust.

 

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