Movie review 'Nerungi Vaa Muthamidathe': One can’t help but feel that the narration could have been better

DC | ANUPAMA SUBRAMANIAN
Published Nov 1, 2014, 11:03 pm IST
Updated Jan 10, 2016, 8:38 am IST
Lakshmy touches upon various social issues in the film like terrorism, smuggling
 
Director: Lakshmy Ramakrishnan

Cast:  Shabeer, Piaa Bajpai, Shruti Hariharan, Thambi Ramaiah

Rating: 2 stars
 
When the entire state suffers due to petrol and diesel crisis, Chandru (debutant Shabeer), a truck driver, takes the task of transporting 2,000 litres of diesel from Trichy to Karaikal port after his scheming boss and local politician, Kaleeshwaran (A L Azhagappan) directs him to do so. 
 
From here, the movie traces the journey of Chandru when he comes across several characters and their background narrated in back and forth flashbacks in this travelogue drama. There is this eloped couple who belongs to different caste who takes refuge with Chandru and he promises to drop them in the next town. Then you see a couple -Maya (Piaa Bajpai) and her boyfriend stranded on the road due to a bike accident who takes Chandru’s help. And a stranger (Thambi Ramaiah) who also gets into the lorry and later we were shown the purpose of his act. How Chandru overcomes all odds and triumphs at the end forms the crux.
 
There are too many characters walking in and out of each scene and hence each actor gets only few scenes on the screen. Shruti Hariharan of Lucia fame though appears in a brief role does her part well. Piaa looks gloomy most part of the film and her sudden change of mind falling for Shabeer is not gratifying. 
 
Thambi Ramaiah is loud and Bala Saravanan fails to evoke laughter. Y.Gee Mahendra proves his versatility once again. At times the screenplay meanders and drags. With the backdrop of ‘liquid gold’ crisis, Lakshmy touches upon various social issues in the film like terrorism, smuggling, casteism, gang rape, disagreement between children and parents, thankfully in a subtle manner. 
 
Music by Madley Blues goes well with the theme of the flick. Though Lakshmy’s attempt is laudable, one can’t help but feel that the narration could have been better.
 
 
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