MOM may have longer life than planned

DC CORRESPONDENT
Published Sep 27, 2014, 9:33 am IST
Updated Mar 31, 2019, 1:38 am IST
The mission may extend beyond the planned six months up to even one year
Scientists behind Mars Orbiter Mission including  Director of the Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC) at Bengaluru B.K. Venkitaramu, Director of the Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC) at Valiamala K. Sivan, LPSC associate director N.R.
 Scientists behind Mars Orbiter Mission including Director of the Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC) at Bengaluru B.K. Venkitaramu, Director of the Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC) at Valiamala K. Sivan, LPSC associate director N.R.
Thiruvananthapuram: The life of Mars Orbiter Mission  may extend beyond the planned six months up to even one year, according to Mr K. Sivan, director of the Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC) at Valiamala.
 
Mr Sivan was speaking at a felicitation function organised by the Press Club here on Friday to honour  25 scientists of the LPSC, which played a significant role in the Mars mission.
 
“Mangalyaan  put  India on top of the world space science map. The accuracy we achieved was very high,”  Mr Sivan said. The contribution of LPSC, which built the crucial liquid propeller motor for Mangalyaan, was more significant in the mission than that of other ISRO centres,” he said.    
 
The mission  was not just for taking photographs of the Red Planet, but had many other scientific objectives, he said.
 
LPSC associate director N.R. Vishnu Kartha said that the space agency was also working on a technology that can send man to  space. This could be achieved after developing  a higher capacity payload vehicle. “The priority is not on sending someone to moon, but developing a higher capacity payload vehicle,” Mr Kartha said.
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