Chandni Choke to Haze Khas

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | REMYA SCARIA
Published Nov 11, 2017, 6:42 am IST
Updated Nov 11, 2017, 6:42 am IST
Bengalureans who have moved to Delhi on work or to study, talk about the smog.
Anubhav Seth
 Anubhav Seth

A dark cloud continues to loom over Delhites who woke up to a smoke screen on Tuesday.  This is the second time that the city has made news due to this catastrophe, with reduced visibility and ill health making everyday life a struggle for many. In a candid chat, these youngsters who frequent the city often, share their insights. Drishti Sharma, a Literature student who’s often flying between Bengaluru and Delhi, perfectly understands the scenario. “I could see how incapable the public felt about it. People are discussing it on the public transport, educating themselves and buying air masks. Breathing becomes heavy and there is zero respite for (sensitive) eyes. I really feel the city tries but drops the ball right before the finish line.”

The deteriorating conditions were indeed noticeable but there was little that could have been done. Anubhav Seth who is back in the city after working in Delhi says, “When I was there, I felt the colours of the city itself had changed so much. The air was heavy, and I couldn’t see a proper blue sky like I always do in Bengaluru. I used to be excited to visit Delhi, but now I don’t want to go anywhere near it.” The abysmal conditions have seen an upsurge in sales of face masks and air purifiers as people rushed to get theirs. Chinmai Das, a masters student who recently shifted to Delhi only hopes that Bengaluru never suffers such misfortune, “A couple of years ago when I heard about the disastrous situation in Delhi with the smog, I couldn’t really comprehend it’s severity. Having experienced it first hand now, I realise the extent of devastation it can cause. I can feel the deteriorated quality of air in my lungs every single time I step out.”

Namritha Murali, a Christ University graduate who currently resides in the capital comments, “This feels like breathing poison. Technically Delhi should be evacuated by now. I use the metro to get to work. The face mask is not much help in reality, but the placebo effect makes day to day living manageable.”





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