Victory Day: Remembering Russian Red Army's sacrifice

AP
Published May 11, 2017, 1:32 pm IST
Updated Jul 10, 2017, 12:57 pm IST
Russian President Vladimir Putin was present with a photograph of his father in a naval uniform. He stood with people carrying portraits of relatives who fought in World War II, during the Immortal Regiment march in Red Square, in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday May 9, 2017. (Photo: AP)
 Russian President Vladimir Putin was present with a photograph of his father in a naval uniform. He stood with people carrying portraits of relatives who fought in World War II, during the Immortal Regiment march in Red Square, in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday May 9, 2017. (Photo: AP)
Russian President Vladimir Putin was present with a photograph of his father in a naval uniform. He stood with people carrying portraits of relatives who fought in World War II, during the Immortal Regiment march in Red Square, in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday May 9, 2017. (Photo: AP)
Victory Day is Russia's most important secular holiday, commemorating the Red Army's determination and losses in World War II.
Russia celebrates the 1945 defeat of Nazi Germany every May 9 to honour the 8 million Red Army soldiers who fought and died for their country. (Photo: AP)
The Soviet Union is estimated to have lost 26 million people in the war, including the 8 million soldiers. Hundreds of people gathered in front of the Soviet War memorial at the district Treptow, in Berlin during an event commemorating the end of World War II 72 years ago.
Police said the crowd numbered about 600,000, a show of determination to keep the war's renown alive.
Parades were held across Russia's sprawling expanse as well as in the Russia-annexed Crimea Peninsula, but the Red Square procession is the centerpiece of Russia's observances.
Russian President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday told the annual Victory Day parade on Red Square that the horrors of World War II demonstrate the necessity of countries working together to prevent war. He also met with WWII veteran, Hero of the Soviet Union, Sergei Kramarenko, during the Victory Day reception.
The Red Square parade is a highly ritualized display, and marked changes in its order are unusual. Moldovan President Igor Dodon, center, attends a wreath-laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Moscow.