People enjoying the rare Solar Eclipse across North America
As the Sun took it place behind the moon, and let the latter cast its shadow over earth sky-gazers stood transfixed in North America armed with their protective glasses to glimpse the rare solar eclipse that swept the continent for the first time in nearly a century. (Photo: AFP)
As the Sun took it place behind the moon, and let the latter cast its shadow over earth sky-gazers stood transfixed in North America armed with their protective glasses to glimpse the rare solar eclipse that swept the continent for the first time in nearly a century. (Photo: AFP)
A street artist dressed as a bronze statue uses special glasses to view a partial solar eclipse in Havana, Cuba, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
A street artist dressed as a bronze statue uses special glasses to view a partial solar eclipse in Havana, Cuba, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
After their wedding ceremony, groom and bride, Nathan Mauger, Connie Young with family and friends, toast to the solar eclipse from the Rose Garden in Manito Park, Monday, Aug 21, 2017, in Spokane, Wash. (Colin Mulvany/The Spokesman-Review via AP)
After their wedding ceremony, groom and bride, Nathan Mauger, Connie Young with family and friends, toast to the solar eclipse from the Rose Garden in Manito Park, Monday, Aug 21, 2017, in Spokane, Wash. (Colin Mulvany/The Spokesman-Review via AP)
Blake Davis, 10, of Coral Springs, Fla., looks through solar glasses as he watches the eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, at Nova Southeastern University in Davie, Fla. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
Blake Davis, 10, of Coral Springs, Fla., looks through solar glasses as he watches the eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, at Nova Southeastern University in Davie, Fla. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
Lake Mary, Fla., High School students react to seeing the sun, using their eclipse glasses for the first time during a trial run, Friday, Aug. 18, 2017, for their planned viewing of Monday's eclipse. Eclipse mania is building and so is demand for the glasses that make it safe to view the first total solar eclipse to cross the U.S. in 99 years. (Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel via AP)
Lake Mary, Fla., High School students react to seeing the sun, using their eclipse glasses for the first time during a trial run, Friday, Aug. 18, 2017, for their planned viewing of Monday's eclipse. Eclipse mania is building and so is demand for the glasses that make it safe to view the first total solar eclipse to cross the U.S. in 99 years. (Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel via AP)
Piper Truza watches a phase of a partial solar eclipse visible in Detroit, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. Millions of Americans gazed in wonder through telescopes, cameras and disposable protective glasses Monday as the moon blotted out the sun in the first full-blown solar eclipse to sweep the U.S. from coast to coast in nearly a century. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
Piper Truza watches a phase of a partial solar eclipse visible in Detroit, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. Millions of Americans gazed in wonder through telescopes, cameras and disposable protective glasses Monday as the moon blotted out the sun in the first full-blown solar eclipse to sweep the U.S. from coast to coast in nearly a century. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
The sun peeks through the clouds as people wearing solar glasses watch the eclipse in Falls City, Neb., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
The sun peeks through the clouds as people wearing solar glasses watch the eclipse in Falls City, Neb., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Coreen Abbott watches the solar eclipse from Bernal Heights Hill in San Francisco, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
Coreen Abbott watches the solar eclipse from Bernal Heights Hill in San Francisco, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
Liza Leykina, right, holds up a pair of glasses for Mark Solovey to shoot a photo through as they watch the solar eclipse from Bernal Heights Hill in San Francisco, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
Liza Leykina, right, holds up a pair of glasses for Mark Solovey to shoot a photo through as they watch the solar eclipse from Bernal Heights Hill in San Francisco, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
A crowd gathers in front of the Hollywood sign at the Griffith Observatory to watch the solar eclipse in Los Angeles on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
A crowd gathers in front of the Hollywood sign at the Griffith Observatory to watch the solar eclipse in Los Angeles on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
Susan Boll, of Carlisle, Iowa, reacts as she puts her glasses on during an eclipse watch party, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Susan Boll, of Carlisle, Iowa, reacts as she puts her glasses on during an eclipse watch party, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Tyler Hanson, of Fort Rucker, Ala., watches the sun moments before the total eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. Millions of Americans gazed in wonder through telescopes, cameras and disposable protective glasses Monday as the moon blotted out the sun in the first full-blown solar eclipse to sweep the U.S. from coast to coast in nearly a century. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
Tyler Hanson, of Fort Rucker, Ala., watches the sun moments before the total eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. Millions of Americans gazed in wonder through telescopes, cameras and disposable protective glasses Monday as the moon blotted out the sun in the first full-blown solar eclipse to sweep the U.S. from coast to coast in nearly a century. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
Amir Morgan and Kira Mabry look up at the sun during a solar eclipse watching event at Rowan University in Glassboro, N.J., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (Jose F. Moreno/Camden Courier-Post via AP)
Amir Morgan and Kira Mabry look up at the sun during a solar eclipse watching event at Rowan University in Glassboro, N.J., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (Jose F. Moreno/Camden Courier-Post via AP)