Jordan diaries: Priyanka shares inspiring tales of Syrian kids hit by war
Not just a UNICEF ambassador, Priyanka Chopra turned journalist on her trip to Jordan to meet Syrian people affected by war. The actress shared some inspiring and touching stories of some of them on her Instagram handle.
Not just a UNICEF ambassador, Priyanka Chopra turned journalist on her trip to Jordan to meet Syrian people affected by war. The actress shared some inspiring and touching stories of some of them on her Instagram handle.
Sharing this video, the actress wrote, "I have never done this when I do field trips, but on this one I feel compelled to reflect on what I feel after every session because I felt a lot. The anger and agony I felt seeing these beautiful hopeful children ravaged by war was so raw. The world has seen the pain war has left in Syria but the resilience and joy and hope in spite of it is so inspiring to me. These kids are my inspiration. They should be yours too. 
PLS GO TO www.unicef.org and DONATE whatever you can... let's make this a collective #MissionForChildren."
Sharing this video, the actress wrote, "I have never done this when I do field trips, but on this one I feel compelled to reflect on what I feel after every session because I felt a lot. The anger and agony I felt seeing these beautiful hopeful children ravaged by war was so raw. The world has seen the pain war has left in Syria but the resilience and joy and hope in spite of it is so inspiring to me. These kids are my inspiration. They should be yours too. PLS GO TO www.unicef.org and DONATE whatever you can... let's make this a collective #MissionForChildren."
Sharing another video, she shared, "Fadi. Seven years old. Was so excited that he knew how to write his name in English but wrote it left to right because he knew arabic. It was very cute so we learnt how to write his name in English and he taught me to write my name in Arabic."
Sharing another video, she shared, "Fadi. Seven years old. Was so excited that he knew how to write his name in English but wrote it left to right because he knew arabic. It was very cute so we learnt how to write his name in English and he taught me to write my name in Arabic."
Sharing another video of interacting with another girl, she wrote, "This is Eman. She is an artist and these are her sketches. This particular one caught my attention because it depicts her version of the war. A man in a jail trying to feed a little bird. It broke my heart to see so much compassion despite of being so ravaged by war. Eman wants to show the world through her art what her imagination holds. God Bless."
Sharing another video of interacting with another girl, she wrote, "This is Eman. She is an artist and these are her sketches. This particular one caught my attention because it depicts her version of the war. A man in a jail trying to feed a little bird. It broke my heart to see so much compassion despite of being so ravaged by war. Eman wants to show the world through her art what her imagination holds. God Bless."
"Cultures are so lovely.so different yet so similar. Kalam is arabic for pen and it's kalam in Urdu/Hindi too. We found that funny. Since the kids were learning English I thought Pencil may be appropriate," read the caption to this post.
"Cultures are so lovely.so different yet so similar. Kalam is arabic for pen and it's kalam in Urdu/Hindi too. We found that funny. Since the kids were learning English I thought Pencil may be appropriate," read the caption to this post.
Along with this picture, she said, "A class full of future doctors, engineers, police officers, teachers. What breaks my heart is they can't even access proper schools as refugee kids. How will they access higher education? These hopes and dreams, where do they stand in the reality of their world? The government schools in Jordan have added evening classes and 200 schools to accommodate the growing number of Syrian children which is approximately 120000 children. But it's never enough. The world needs to help. We need to help.
Along with this picture, she said, "A class full of future doctors, engineers, police officers, teachers. What breaks my heart is they can't even access proper schools as refugee kids. How will they access higher education? These hopes and dreams, where do they stand in the reality of their world? The government schools in Jordan have added evening classes and 200 schools to accommodate the growing number of Syrian children which is approximately 120000 children. But it's never enough. The world needs to help. We need to help.
"This is Ammar, Ayat, Sulaiman, Wardshan. Their elder brother Saleh works at a grocery store to earn for the family, for only 2 Jordanian Dinar. Their father is a day laborer. Sulaiman needs a 2nd surgery because he has a clot in his nose. They moved from Syria to Jordan 5 years ago. When I asked their mother what would be her wish, she said "if we can't go home all I want is for my kids to get an education so they can fend for themselves when they are older and help rebuild Syria. We are blessed, we have enough to survive, others have much less." They didn't even have furniture in their home. The largesse of heart and compassion she had through her tears moved me to pieces."
"This is Ammar, Ayat, Sulaiman, Wardshan. Their elder brother Saleh works at a grocery store to earn for the family, for only 2 Jordanian Dinar. Their father is a day laborer. Sulaiman needs a 2nd surgery because he has a clot in his nose. They moved from Syria to Jordan 5 years ago. When I asked their mother what would be her wish, she said "if we can't go home all I want is for my kids to get an education so they can fend for themselves when they are older and help rebuild Syria. We are blessed, we have enough to survive, others have much less." They didn't even have furniture in their home. The largesse of heart and compassion she had through her tears moved me to pieces."
Sharing this video, she said, "Today was very emotional. As we go about our daily privileged lives, it's hard to imagine that everything can be taken from you in an moment. We spent the day in a host community meeting Syrian refugee families so desperately seeking a safe place of normalcy for their families. More than 80% of the Syrian refugees in Jordan live outside refugee camps in cities, urban centers and farming villages. Amman hosts the largest number of Syrian refugees, about 180,000 people. Refugee families in host communities have limited livelihood opportunities, and after 6 years, have depleted their savings, borrowed money from everywhere to feed and support their families."
Sharing this video, she said, "Today was very emotional. As we go about our daily privileged lives, it's hard to imagine that everything can be taken from you in an moment. We spent the day in a host community meeting Syrian refugee families so desperately seeking a safe place of normalcy for their families. More than 80% of the Syrian refugees in Jordan live outside refugee camps in cities, urban centers and farming villages. Amman hosts the largest number of Syrian refugees, about 180,000 people. Refugee families in host communities have limited livelihood opportunities, and after 6 years, have depleted their savings, borrowed money from everywhere to feed and support their families."
Introducing other girls, she wrote, "Say hello to Omaima 16, Seba 17, Shaimaa 14, Hanin 15, Maria 15, Wafa 13, Ayat 16, and Maram 15. These are 16-17 yr olds in a school in the Za'atari Refugee Camp. Omaima couldn't carry much when she and her family fled Syria...so she decided to carry soil and rocks from her garden to remember her country."
Introducing other girls, she wrote, "Say hello to Omaima 16, Seba 17, Shaimaa 14, Hanin 15, Maria 15, Wafa 13, Ayat 16, and Maram 15. These are 16-17 yr olds in a school in the Za'atari Refugee Camp. Omaima couldn't carry much when she and her family fled Syria...so she decided to carry soil and rocks from her garden to remember her country."
In the same post she added, "Seba said they have all prepared themselves for when they go back to Syria after the war is over...knowing it will be almost unrecognizable. That's the reason they go to school everyday, so that they can rebuild Syria again. Their determination for education, however much they can get, is incredible and truly overwhelming. These girls don't have much at all, but yet Seba and Omaima took their bracelet and ring off to give me so I will always remember them. I'll always remember you...I promise. It's kids like this that will build a better world tomorrow."
In the same post she added, "Seba said they have all prepared themselves for when they go back to Syria after the war is over...knowing it will be almost unrecognizable. That's the reason they go to school everyday, so that they can rebuild Syria again. Their determination for education, however much they can get, is incredible and truly overwhelming. These girls don't have much at all, but yet Seba and Omaima took their bracelet and ring off to give me so I will always remember them. I'll always remember you...I promise. It's kids like this that will build a better world tomorrow."
In another post, she wrote, "Most of these girls (8-10yrs) have lived in this refugee camp for more than half their lives... so they probably don't even remember what normalcy in life is outside of a refugee status... their smiles come from such a pure place, of making the most of whatever they have... of survivors."
In another post, she wrote, "Most of these girls (8-10yrs) have lived in this refugee camp for more than half their lives... so they probably don't even remember what normalcy in life is outside of a refugee status... their smiles come from such a pure place, of making the most of whatever they have... of survivors."
In the same post, she added, "In Za'atari, there are currently 27,000 children enrolled in the 14 school complexes. Although there are make shift seats for every child in the camp, the enrollment is about 78% as children drop out due to child marriages, child labor and family attitudes towards education. All schools in the camp work two shifts, with girls classes in the morning and boys in the afternoon. We visited this school in the morning, so we met the girls."
In the same post, she added, "In Za'atari, there are currently 27,000 children enrolled in the 14 school complexes. Although there are make shift seats for every child in the camp, the enrollment is about 78% as children drop out due to child marriages, child labor and family attitudes towards education. All schools in the camp work two shifts, with girls classes in the morning and boys in the afternoon. We visited this school in the morning, so we met the girls."
Sharing this photo, she wrote, "This is Z'aid - he is 16 years old and is a child laborer. He works as a tailor and a barber but he aspires to be a translator. He loves languages and wants to learn as many as he can...he wants to help the world understand each other better.Build bridges. He is full of so much optimism for the future of the world despite of being ravaged by war...so while he's not at work he comes to the Makani Center to learn and educate himself..He made this bow by hand, and offered it to me as a gift of friendship... it's kids like this that will build a better world tomorrow."
Sharing this photo, she wrote, "This is Z'aid - he is 16 years old and is a child laborer. He works as a tailor and a barber but he aspires to be a translator. He loves languages and wants to learn as many as he can...he wants to help the world understand each other better.Build bridges. He is full of so much optimism for the future of the world despite of being ravaged by war...so while he's not at work he comes to the Makani Center to learn and educate himself..He made this bow by hand, and offered it to me as a gift of friendship... it's kids like this that will build a better world tomorrow."
Posting a video along with the pictures, she wrote, ""Excuse the bad cartwheel and lame attempt at a Rugby toss...
This is a Makani 'Drop In' Center for underage boys who work,they are referred to as "Child Laborers." Most of the boys are between 10 and 18 years old, work 6-12 hours per day, and literally drop in after work to play and receive an informal education, as well as learn life skills."
Posting a video along with the pictures, she wrote, ""Excuse the bad cartwheel and lame attempt at a Rugby toss... This is a Makani 'Drop In' Center for underage boys who work,they are referred to as "Child Laborers." Most of the boys are between 10 and 18 years old, work 6-12 hours per day, and literally drop in after work to play and receive an informal education, as well as learn life skills."
In the same post, she wrote, "Many of the boys you see in these pictures have only just started to learn how to read and write, since the priority for most of these boys is to provide sustenance for their families. The teachers here work 3 shifts each day to accommodate the influx of kids to give them a chance to work and study. We must do our bit. This is what WAR looks like. Consequence of Conflict."
In the same post, she wrote, "Many of the boys you see in these pictures have only just started to learn how to read and write, since the priority for most of these boys is to provide sustenance for their families. The teachers here work 3 shifts each day to accommodate the influx of kids to give them a chance to work and study. We must do our bit. This is what WAR looks like. Consequence of Conflict."