Saheba movie review: Crazy start with the story as hero

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | SHASHIPRASAD SM
Published Aug 27, 2017, 11:08 am IST
Updated Aug 27, 2017, 2:24 pm IST
Saheba is not something which may become a classic, but it is an example of trusting the basics of film-making.
A still from 'Saheba.'
 A still from 'Saheba.'
Rating:

Director: Bharath

Cast: Manoranjan Ravichandran, Shanvi Srivastava, Julie Lakshmi, Chidanand, Bullet Prakash

Call it special or a crazy debut of the eldest son of Sandalwood's showman Crazy Star V. Ravichandran, one of the most anticipated and closely watched 'launch' in recent times. While the normal tendency is to launch in a big way the son/daughter of a huge star actor, this one is thankfully the most simple and sensible film which leaves the majority satisfied, mostly the crazy fans.

While keeping aside the crazy aspects, whether 'Saheba' as a whole offers any real 'manoranjan' (entertainment) become the 'reel' question. The answer is in the affirmative but before jumping into any further conclusion, there is also a word of caution. This one is definitely not for those mindsets which are accustomed to the complete formula-laced commercial movie, where the hero is the star of a film and other things such as 'sensible' story, screenplay, etc. are never a relevant factor.

On a simpler note, Saheba is a tale of an ideal son living a satisfied life surrounded by his love for books and his mother who brought him up the right way. The bookish tales takes a twist when Mano, played by Manoranjan, comes across Nandini, who is played by Shanvi. No, it is not the case of love at first sight. The struggling Nandini and her mother seeking goldy interventions for a better future, interests Mano. He then secretly takes Nandini's matter into his hands and leads her to a bright path. She soon becomes a star heroine.

While there is a lot space for improvement for Manoranjan to be a better actor but considering 'Saheba' as his first film, he is a sure winner. Yes, he can dance too. Whereas, Shanvi who has a meaty role on par with the male protagonist, is at her best. In the first half, she is naturally cute and in the second half, she shines with a beautiful performance. 

Back to the core of Saheba, the story continues to be the hero, and it does demand a bit of patience in the middle but soon gains momentum. For the rest of it, do watch it in theatres. Again, there are no unwanted 'dishum, dishum' fight or constant build up scenes involving only the hero! 

It reminds of all those sensible films from the past, where the basics of film making including story were given utmost prominence and the great actors would lift them to another level, turning them into timeless classics. Saheba is not something which may become a classic but it is an example of trusting the basics of film making. In the end, it is always the tale which never stales.





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