Savarakathhi movie review: A double-edged razor worth a watch!

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | ANUPAMA SUBRAMANIAN
Published Feb 10, 2018, 6:24 pm IST
Updated Feb 10, 2018, 6:24 pm IST
Manga (Mysskin) is a ruthless gangster on the last day of parole from his long stint in prison.
A still from Savarakathhi.
 A still from Savarakathhi.
Rating:

Director: Adhitya

Cast: Mysshkin, Raam, Poorna

 

Mysshkin’s movies are usually dark and gloomy with hard-hitting themes. For a change, the filmmaker/actor has come out with a quirky dark comedy Savarakatthi where he has penned the story and screenplay and just opted to be in front of the camera as one of leads, leaving direction department with his brother Adithya.

Manga (Mysskin) is a ruthless gangster on the last day of parole from his long stint in prison. When Manga wants to spend his last day along with his underlings, a mishap happens with Pichaimoorthy (Raam) a barber and a perpetual liar as he rides a 80s mobike Rajdoot with his full term pregnant wife Subadhra (Poorna) with an hearing impairment and two kids. They were to attend Subadhra’s younger brother’s marriage before the rich parents of bride-to-be stoppee it. An irked Pichai yells at Manga and his men and raises his hand to hit him. An ego bloated Manga swears to kill Pichai and what follows is a daylong fun-filled chase till the parole ends.

All the lead characters look eccentric and a bit overboard, but they are meant to be like that in a film like Savarakatthi, which is a character driven story. Mysshkin in an unconventional role with a mix of humor and the frightening Manga has delivered a terrific performance. Raam continues his good act from Thanga Meengal although here he is loud (he needs to talk loudly as his wife is a deaf) and has a role laced with comedy. Poorna as the stone-deaf pregnant woman has given a lifetime performance and is a revelation. She could emote perfectly, thanks to her decision to dub her own voice for the first time. No doubt an award winning feat! Mysshkin’s writing is sharp and what works mostly is the dark comedy that is inbuilt in the script in unexpected moments. The first half moves at rapid speed while the same cannot be said post interval. Also, the treatment of disability and mental illness could have been dealt with more sensitivity.

Arrol Corelli’s rerecording is a highpoint in the movie. His topnotch background score and the title Savarakatthi track and the inspiring montage song go well with the mood of the film. Karthik’s cinematography is worth mention. Yet another big plus is the film’s running time, which is just 114 minutes. A double-edged razor worth a watch!





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