Thiruttu Payale 2 movie review: Engaging thriller worth a watch

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | ANUPAMA SUBRAMANIAN
Published Dec 2, 2017, 7:50 pm IST
Updated Dec 2, 2017, 8:00 pm IST
It is not exactly a sequel to Susi Ganesan’s earlier movie with the same name made more than a decade ago.
Bobby Simha and Amala Paul in a still from 'Thiruttu Payale 2.'
 Bobby Simha and Amala Paul in a still from 'Thiruttu Payale 2.'
Rating:

Director: Susi Ganesan

Cast: Bobby Simha, Prasanna, Amala Paul

 

'Thiruttu Payale 2' is not exactly a sequel to Susi Ganesan’s earlier movie with the same name made more than a decade ago, which had bold content that dealt with extramarital affair and was much ahead of its time. Here, the director deals with the technology boom and its menace, and how it can manipulate and destroy human lives.

Selvam (Bobby Simha) works in the intelligence wing of police, and he has been assigned with the job of tapping calls of high profile police officers and politicians. Selvam, who has earned the name of an honest cop, has another side to him.  He puts his newfound power to good use and secretly starts making huge money. 

Selvam has a beautiful wife Agal Vilakku (Amala Paul) who is addicted to Facebook. When all seems going well, Agal befriends Balki (Prasanna) through Facebook, a rich guy who is good at impressing girls. Few months later, Agal starts sensing the bad intensions of Balki, and by the time she tries to put an end to his advances, it is too late. Meanwhile, Selvam gets the shock of his life when he learns that Agal has connections with another man during one of his tapping sessions. The rest is all about how Selvam, who understands his wife’s plight, saves his wife from Balki, which is narrated in an engaging manner with twists and turns.

Bobby Simha is quite apt as a middle class husband and an ambitious man too. Amala Paul looks pretty and scored in the role of a youngster addicted to FB, revealing her bit of glamour and later as a confused woman conveying right emotions. It is Prasanna, with a fit body, who steals the show with his cool villainy act. Susi himself appears in a cameo as a private detective. The entire first half moves at a rapid pace and is gripping for most part of it. But, the same cannot be said for the post-intermission portions. What is the need for the story to travel abroad? And the way Selvam pins down Balki is also far-fetched, with the climax also being clichéd.

Music by Vidyasagar is just about adequate, but cinematography by Chelladurai warrants mention.

Kudos to Susi for choosing a relevant issue and all the same presenting it without any obscenity.  All the characters of Susi have a bad shade to them and pretend one way or other. The director is not judgmental and left it for audience to decide. Overall, an engaging thriller worth a watch.





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